NC Budget and Tax Center

Report: Constitutional restrictions on revenue hurt state economies. So why is NC proposing one?

A new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) shows how constitutional revenue limits, like the one proposed in North Carolina by the Senate, can impede state economies. From the report:

“A strong state economy requires high-quality public services like schools, public colleges and universities, and well-maintained infrastructure, among other services. Businesses need well-educated and qualified workers. They need convenient and well-functioning roads, bridges, and ports. And they’re more likely to locate in places with a good quality of life that includes publicly financed amenities like parks and libraries.

“Nevertheless, some states are considering building into their state constitutions restrictions on the growth of state revenue that makes such public investments possible. These restrictions can hurt a state’s ability to provide necessary services to its residents and businesses, putting at risk long-term growth and broadly shared prosperity.”

You can read the full report here.

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