Courts & the Law, Governor Roy Cooper, HB2, News

The Week’s Top Five on NC Policy Watch

1. Another look at Cooper’s doggedly impressive start

As the national pundits weigh in on President Trump’s first 100 days in office and the General Assembly careens toward its self-imposed crossover deadline for legislation, it’s worth considering how Governor Roy Cooper has fared in his first 100+ days on the job.

He reached that threshold a couple of weeks ago with little fanfare. There were a few news reports and an interview or two, but most of the political world was still assessing the fallout from the partial repeal of HB2 and monitoring the latest efforts by the General Assembly to take powers away from Cooper that previous governors have held.

The 100-day threshold also felt less noteworthy because of the way Cooper’s term began and what happened before he took the oath of office. [Read more...]

2. A flood of bad ideas
How the General Assembly is spending “crossover week” and what it ought to be doing

The last week of April arrived soggy and gray yesterday in North Carolina. It’s as if the weather gods had taken a sneak peek at the agenda for one of the busiest weeks of the year at the General Assembly and were shedding a steady stream of preemptory tears.

Yes, this is “crossover week” in Raleigh – one of those strange and obscure “inside the Legislative Building” phenomena that are, at once, difficult to fathom and highly impactful on the lives of millions of everyday North Carolinians.

Every other year, state lawmakers self-impose something known as the “crossover deadline.” The basic and not utterly unreasonable rule is that unless a bill is approved by at least one legislative body (either the Senate or the House of Representatives) by the end of this legislative week, it will be ineligible to become law this year. The idea behind “crossover,” of course, is that it provides a culling mechanism that can help a part-time legislature manage the deluge of bills (there have been 1,448 introduced so far in 2017) it needs to wade through. [Read more…]

3. Controversial charter growth bill sails through the state House

Despite criticism from the Republican chair of the State Board of Education, members of the state House of Representatives voted Thursday to clear speedy expansion for some North Carolina charters.

Under House Bill 779, charters would be able to boost their enrollment by up to 30 percent without seeking state approval, provided they have not been identified as low-performing.

The version that emerged on the House floor Thursday night included several modifications from the GOP-led bill, which had called for any charter, regardless of academic performance, to have clearance for expanding enrollment by up to 40 percent. [Read more…]

***Bonus stories from Crossover Week:

4. Republican judge on protesting bill reducing Court of Appeals: ‘There weren’t any other options’

On Monday morning, there was only one way left to save the Court of Appeals and a few hours with which to do it.

Just two days earlier, Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper vetoed House Bill 239, which would reduce the state’s appellate court from 15 judges to 12. It was expected that the Republican-led General Assembly would override that veto as soon as they could, despite a lot of opposition from both sides of the aisle.

“Every argument had been produced to no avail; statistics were provided to [legislators] by a judge from our court; … four chief justices told them this is a bad move, that this is going to hurt the courts, that this was ill-advised; our court had told them that,” said former Judge Douglas McCullough. “There was only one way left. There weren’t any other options.” [Read more…]

5. Investment firm CEO: Partial HB2 repeal was not enough

The political compromise that repealed HB2 was enough for the NCAA and ACC, both of which have returned sporting events to North Carolina.

But is disappointment with the compromise and a flurry of new anti-LGBT proposals from the General Assembly continuing to hurt the state’s reputation? And can it recover?

“I would say it’s definitely not all over with the repeal,” said Matthew Patsky, CEO of Trillium Asset Management.

With more than $2 billion under management, Trillium has offices in Boston, San Francisco, Portland, Oregon and Durham. They were part of a group of investing firms handling more than $2 trillion that warned against the economic impact of HB2 in September of last year. [Read more…]

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