Commentary

Absurd takes from Berger and Forest on the courts and the Constitution

Republican legislative leaders continue to scramble to distract attention from the fact that the U.S Supreme Court, with a Republican majority that includes President Trump’s appointee, unanimously ruled that they violated the constitution by racially gerrymandering state legislative districts.

Thursday, they not only refused a call by Governor Roy Cooper to convene a special session to draw new districts to replace the ones the court threw out, they feigned outrage that he would suggest it.

Never mind that the court ruling means that the General Assembly is conducting business representing districts that violate the constitution or that the voters of the state, and potential candidates, deserve to know what the new districts look like as soon as possible.

Legislative leaders instead mounted an all-out rhetorical attack on Gov. Cooper for suggesting that they abide by the court’s ruling and draw new and legal districts.

There were dozens of ridiculous claims made, but statements by Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger and Lt. Gov. Dan Forest were the most absurd.  Berger told the Associated Press that he didn’t make the decision lightly to refuse Cooper’s call of a special session and added this gem.

We need to be serious about what the Constitution requires.

The U.S. Supreme Court says the Constitution requires legislative districts that aren’t racially gerrymandered. Maybe Berger should try that—if he wants to be serious.

Meanwhile, Lt. Gov. Dan Forest released a slick video  (who paid for that you have to wonder) as part of his ongoing campaign for governor in 2020 because he thought the public “might want to know why” he ruled Cooper’s request for a special session unconstitutional.

He ends the well-lit appearance with this deep philosophical thought.

Be reminded, what the progressive movement cannot attain at the ballot box, they are attempting to attain from the courts

Thanks for the reminder. But that’s an odd thing to say about a ruling from the conservative U.S. Supreme Court that Republicans violated the constitution to stay in power with their racial gerrymandering.

It might lead some folks to think that it is actually Republicans in North Carolina who are trying to thwart the will of the people at the ballot box by violating the Constitution they have sworn to uphold.

 

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