Commentary

New report: Immigrants a key to economic growth for NC — both now and in the future

The latest installment in the N.C. Budget and Tax Center’s “Prosperity Watch” series (“Immigrants projected to drive labor force growth for years to come”) highlights the key role immigrants play (and will continue to play) in North Carolina’s economic growth. Check it out below.

A recent report by the Pew Research Center points to the central role that immigrants and children of immigrants will play in growing our labor force and economy in the years to come. The report outlines that immigrants, and children of immigrants, are projected to be the primary drivers of growth in the working-age population through 2035. Specifically, the number of working age immigrants in the U.S. is projected to rise from 33.9 million in 2015 to 38.5 million by 2035.

North Carolinians have also witnessed growth in the immigrant community in our state over the past two decades. North Carolina’s foreign-born population grew by 42 percent between 2005 and 2015. As of 2015, immigrants make up 7.7 percent of the total state population. In regards to our state’s immigrant labor force, as of 2015, 84.2 percent of the immigrant population in our state is between the ages of 18 and 64.  From 2000 to 2015, North Carolina’s immigrant population grew steadily, following the same pattern that is highlighted in the Pew Research Center report.

The report also highlights the important contributions that children of immigrants will have in growing the labor force. According to the report, children of immigrants in the U.S. are projected to grow from 11.1 million in 2015 to 24.6 million in 2035. Moreover, children of U.S.-born parents are projected to decline by 8.2 million between 2015 and 2035, and also decline as a share of the working-age population. In North Carolina, 19 percent of children under the age of 18 have one or more foreign-born parent as of 2015. In 2000, only 9.1 percent of children under the age of 18 had one or more foreign-born parent.

Given that our state’s immigrant labor force is set to follow the national pattern, it is clear that immigrants and their children will continue to be the key to securing a thriving economy in our state in the years to come.

Check Also

NC Policy Watch Policy Prescription #9: Expanding opportunities for justice within the criminal justice system

As the 2018 legislative session gets underway in ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

North Carolina election employees could soon be facing stricter scrutiny. House members rolled out a [...]

In one of the largest campaign donation forfeitures in state history, 48 improper donations from the [...]

Friends, neighbors, colleagues of commission chairman Jim Womack submit nearly identical letters cla [...]

When N.C. House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger addressed reporters last [...]

In the aftermath of the recent successful push to ward off huge cuts to food assistance programs in [...]

There are a lot of important statistics that confirm just how out of whack the U.S. economy has grow [...]

The post Bite the Apple & NC’s HB2 Legacy appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

When I headed off to college, I could not have predicted that many of the funding streams, positions [...]

Now hiring

NC Policy Watch is now hiring a Managing Editor – click here for more info.