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WATCH: Senator criticize lag-time in getting NC teacher-pay to the national average, continued support for vouchers

Legislative Republicans are praising the $23 Billion budget that passed its first reading in the Senate Tuesday night. But state Senator Gladys Robinson says in a surplus year, the General Assembly could have done much better by educators.

The Guilford County lawmaker noted that legislators could have helped teachers reach the national average in pay in two years instead of six. Robinson also took Senate Republicans to task for setting aside $20 million in the next fiscal year for private school vouchers, rather than funding a small stipend for all teachers to cover the cost of classroom supplies, often paid for out of their own pockets.

Click below to hear some of Robinson’s remarks from the Senate chamber:

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