Environment

Update: DEQ posts map, permits and info about ongoing GenX investigation

This map shows where DEQ is sampling for the presence of GenX, an unregulated chemical, which Chemours has discharged into the Cape Fear River. GenX has been detected in public drinking water in Wilmington. (Map: NC DEQ)

The NC Department of Environmental Quality will test water from 12 locations in and near the Cape Fear River for GenX, an unregulated contaminant found in Wilmington’s drinking water.

The sampling sites include the Chemours outfall near Fayetteville, a well in Wrightsville Beach and water treatment plants in New Hanover, Pender and Brunswick counties.

DEQ has posted a map as part of its new section devoted to the GenX investigation on the agency’s home page. Sampling results, which will be used to analyze drinking water safety, will also be posted here. A lab in Colorado and another at an EPA regional office in Research Triangle Park are testing the samples. Chemours, which manufactures Teflon-like materials that produce GenX, has agreed to pay for the analysis and sampling. Results could become available in a month.

Copies of the air quality, hazardous waste and wastewater discharge permits are also listed on the site. The wastewater permit expired on Oct. 31, but has been “administratively continued” until a new permit is issued. Chemours’s application for a renewed wastewater discharge permit is also listed on the DEQ site.

DEQ says it is also “pushing the EPA” for guidance on regulating GenX.

According to DEQ, the EPA is developing an updated health screening level for the chemical. State health department officials have said that the concentrations of GenX in Wilmington’s drinking water present a “low risk” — although the levels are derived from Chemours’s own computer modeling and not actual sampling. However DHHS is reviewing available health data and asking the EPA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for guidance on GenX’s health risks.

 

2 Comments


  1. Glen Thearling

    June 25, 2017 at 1:01 pm

    It not just a GenX issue. Six related non regulated perfluoro chemicals were released into the Cape Fear River.

    From; County of Brunswick Water Quality Report -2015
    The EPA required sampling of the following Unregulated Contaminant & others, in 2015 and detectable amounts were reported
    Perfluoroheptanoic acid (also requested detected in 2014) .022 ug/L
    Perfluorohexanesulfonic acid – PFOSA .01 ug/L
    Perfluorononanoic acid – PFNA .0068 ug/L
    Perfluoroctanesulfonic acid – PFOS .0235 ug/L
    Perfluorooctanoic acid (also requested & detected in 2014) – PFOA 0.0162 ug/L
    Hexavalent Chromium .27 ug/L
    1,4-Dioxane 3.2 ug/L

  2. Dan Toulan

    June 25, 2017 at 7:54 pm

    Thanks Glen, it needs to be more then GenX.
    They need to determine where all these Unregulated Contaminant are coming from.
    And any other Contaminant that are found in our drinking water.

Check Also

In signing wind moratorium and executive order promoting wind energy, Gov. Cooper tries to have cake, eat it too

House Bill 589, a promising renewable energy bill ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

Members of North Carolina’s State Board of Education passed down $2.5 million in legislative cuts Tu [...]

North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein’s most important job is to keep people safe. For the Depa [...]

When Gov. Roy Cooper visits Wilmington on Monday, it's unlikely that he will be greeted by the [...]

When Gov. Roy Cooper signed the Strengthen Opioid Misuse Prevention or STOP Act into law last month, [...]

It is not just health care for 30 million people at stake these days. Democracy is hanging by a thre [...]

President Trump and others in Washington have recently proposed doing away with the longstanding bar [...]

The destructive delusions in the Right’s opposition to public transit The modern day conservative op [...]

The post GenX & ’emerging contaminants’ appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

Featured | Special Projects

NC Budget 2017
The maze of the NC Budget is complex. Follow the stories to follow the money.
Read more


NC Redistricting 2017
New map, new districts, new lawmakers. Here’s what you need to know about gerrymandering in NC.
Read more