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State Board of Elections, Ethics answers questions about Trump Commission inquiry

The Bipartisan State Board of Elections & Ethics Enforcement is trying to stay ahead of inquiries and concerns about President Donald Trump’s Election Integrity Commission’s data request.

In case the 4th of July festivities have kept you preoccupied, here’s what’s going on: The Commission, which was created by Trump to investigate his unverified claims of voter fraud, sent a letter to all 50 states last last week requesting an assortment of voter data.

The letter addressed to Secretary of State Elaine Marshall asks for “publicly available voter roll data for North Carolina” and invites her to contribute her “views and recommendations throughout this process” on a number of election law topics. It’s signed by Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, vice chairman of the Commission.

The State Board will comply with the Commission’s request by making available information about voters that is already public. In an effort to help the public understand the process moving forward and address their concerns, the State Board created a Q&A, released Monday.

Here’s an excerpt:

What voter information is considered “public” under state law?

Under North Carolina law, certain voter information is considered public record. Public records must be made available to anyone who requests them. Voter information that is public includes voter name and address, party affiliation, demographic information (age, gender, race and ethnicity, if provided by the voter on registration application), precinct and jurisdiction information and a list of elections in which the voter participated.

Does the State Board plan to provide the Commission any information that is not public
under state law?

No. Voter information that is considered “confidential information” is not public under state law. “Confidential information” includes: Social Security number (including the last four digits), driver license number, date of birth and voter signature.

Will the State Board provide information about how you voted in any election?

Absolutely not. “Voter history,” which was requested by the Commission, refers to the list of elections in which you have participated and is public information under state law. Who you voted for is not public record and will not be disclosed.

Have more questions? Check out the full Q&A here.

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