Environment, Governor Roy Cooper, public health

“People of NC require your protection”: Gov. Cooper urges EPA to quickly set a safety standard for GenX

Gov. Roy Cooper: Asking the EPA for multiple health studies about GenX

Gov. Roy Cooper sent a letter to EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt today seeking “urgent action to get us answers and solutions” about the health risks of GenX in drinking water. “We need the EPA to move more quickly to finalize its health assessment of GenX and set a maximum contaminant level for it,” Cooper wrote.

GenX is a byproduct of the manufacture of Teflon and non-stick surfaces. Chemours, a spinoff of DuPont, has discharged GenX into the Lower Cape Fear River for decades, but only within the last 18 months have scientists from the EPA and NC State University discovered the chemical in the water. Since then, GenX has been detected at high levels in the drinking water leaving the public utility plants — no traditional treatment method removes it — although the amounts have decreased over the past three weeks since Chemours stopped discharging it into the river. Residents in parts of Brunswick, Pender and New Hanover counties, including the City of Wilmington, presumably have been drinking GenX-contaminated water.

An emerging contaminant, it is not regulated, and thus the EPA has not set a health standard for it. However, last week the state health department set a health goal for GenX of no more than 140 parts per trillion — a drastic reduction from the original 70,000 ppt DHHS had proposed.

The EPA, DuPont and Chemours already agreed to a 2009 consent order requiring the companies to reduce the amount of C8, a chemically similar precursor to GenX, in drinking water of residents living near the Washington Works facility in Parkersburg, W.V. However, as Cooper wrote, Chemours has stated that it believes the order doesn’t apply to the Fayetteville plant. “I ask that the EPA revisit this consent order immediately and modify it to apply to any and all release of GenX.”

 

7-17 Letter to Epa_0 by LisaSorg on Scribd

One Comment


  1. Richard Manyes

    July 18, 2017 at 5:10 am

    Wait, I mean, I know Opie is a politician and all – and I know this gives him a shot at Pruitt – fine, but I hope no one believes NC does not have the authority under the Clean Water Act to regulate this chemical! In fact, DEQ has regulated hundreds of chemicals under the permitting program even when there was no standard. I mean – this is nuts. That is precisely why deq has toxicologists working for it.

    There must be a reason Gov Eudy does not want to regulate this now. They have slow-walked this from the very beginning.

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