Courts & the Law, News

A guide to proposed judicial maps as Court Commission set to meet today

The North Carolina Courts Commission will meet at 10 a.m. today to review House Bill 717, which redraws the state’s judicial districts.

The meeting is open to the public and will be held in room 643 of the Legislative Office Building. The audio will be streamed online here.

NC Policy Watch released the judicial maps — prosecutorial, district and superior courts — with detailed information about which new district each of the state’s judges and district attorneys would fall under.

Here are some statistics on those judicial maps based on the maps NC Policy Watch created and demographic data provided to us Thursday by the Administrative Office of the Courts:

District Court:

There are 12 district court districts that double-bunk judges (pitting incumbents against each other in an election), 10 of which are majority Democrat. They include the following counties: Northampton, New Hanover, Cumberland, Hoke, Wake, Durham, Granville, Guilford, Gaston, Mecklenburg, Forsyth and Buncombe.

  • 32% of all current district court judges are double-bunked in the new proposed map
  • 53% of all Black or African-American district court judges are double-bunked; 47% are Black or African-American females and 65% are Black or African-American males (20% of district court judges are Black or African-American, but only 6% are Black or African-American males)
  • 50% of all Hispanic district court judges are double-bunked (there are only 2)
  • 50% of all district court judges who are considered “other or two or more races” are double-bunked (there are only 2)
  • 37% of female district court judges are double-bunked
  • 29% of male district court judges are double-bunked
  • 40% of all district court judges considered in the minority (female and or not-white and or both) are double-bunked

Superior Court:

In the superior court map, there are 10 districts with judges who are double-bunked, of which seven are majority Democrat. They include the following counties: Durham, Nash, New Hanover, Cumberland, Robeson, Union, Guilford, Rockingham, Orange and Buncombe.

  • 29% of all current superior court judges are double-bunked in the new proposed map
  • 28% of all Black or African-American superior court judges are double-bunked; 12.5% are Black or African-American females (only one of eight is double-bunked) and 40 percent are Black or African-American males
  • 50% of all American Indian or Alaskan Native superior court judges are double-bunked (there are only 2)
  • 29% of all white superior court judges are double-bunked
  • 26% of female superior court judges are double-bunked
  • 28% of male superior court judges are double-bunked
  • 29% of all superior court judges considered in the minority (female and or not-white and or both) are double-bunked

Prosecutorial:

There are three counties in the prosecutorial districts that double-bunk district attorneys — one Democrat and one Republican in Hoke and Moore counties; two Republicans in Henderson, Transylvania and Polk counties; and two Republicans in Surry and Stokes counties.

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