Environment

DEQ nixes yet another part of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline proposal

The NC Department of Environmental Quality has rejected the Atlantic Coast Pipeline’s erosion and sediment control plan, dealing yet another setback to the $5.5 billion project.

In a letter dated Sept. 26, the Division of Energy, Mineral and Land Resources told the ACP owners it had disapproved the plan, primarily because there was so much missing information.

The ACP is co-owned by Dominion Energy, Duke Energy, Southeast Energy Company and Piedmont Natural Gas.

The utilities have until Oct. 11 to submit a revised plan for consideration. If they want to contest DEQ’s disapproval, they must request an administrative hearing by Nov. 25.

ACP’s plan, according to the letter, failed to provide detailed construction sequence and erosion control methods, plus measures required to protect all public and private property from construction damage. DEQ lists the shortcomings of the plan in 17 separate points over three pages.

A specific concern for DEQ is the potential damage pipeline construction would have on the Neuse River. The plan, which originally called for open trenching, has been changed to a method known as a cofferdam. A cofferdam is an enclosure placed in a river, for example, that allows the water to be pumped out. However, the Neuse River is a habitat for many threatened or at-risk species, including the Neuse River waterdog, and draining the water could kill them.

The utilities have claimed that they would try to collect any key species and relocate them — where, though, they didn’t say. But in the process of collecting and moving the species from their habitat, they acknowledged that some of them could be inadvertently killed.

In September, DEQ delayed by three months its decision on whether to grant a 401 water quality and buffer permit to the owners of the ACP. In a letter to the utilities, state environmental officials laid out in two pages myriad missing information, some of it very basic: construction drawings, erosion control plans, a calculation of cumulative impacts and stream restoration plans.

 

ACP_E&SC Plan RRO Disapproval Ltr 092617 by LisaSorg on Scribd

One Comment


  1. richard manyes

    October 10, 2017 at 5:31 am

    Just to be clear – this pipeline will be approved. Duke wants it, and Roy is thick with Duke. That doesn’t mean Duke – or the ratepayers actually, won’t be soaked along the way. Watch for payoffs to SELC “clients.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Check Also

NC WARN taking its solar case vs Duke Energy to state Supreme Court

The question of whether the nonprofit environmental group ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

Just days after a North Carolina official tapped a Robeson County elementary for a controversial cha [...]

Two groups seeking state contracts to run struggling North Carolina schools have professional ties t [...]

North Carolinians will lose their “precious right to vote,” as U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader [...]

Saturday nights at the 311 Motor Speedway in rural Pine Hall smell of fast food and fuel. Wooden ble [...]

Why the legislature now operates this way and why it’s a big problem The North Carolina General Asse [...]

The post NCAA Legitimacy Deflated appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

There are lots of reasons for people to get off of the sidelines and commit themselves to new and su [...]

4---number of days since The Trump administration announced its decision to halt cost-sharing subsid [...]

Featured | Special Projects

NC Budget 2017
The maze of the NC Budget is complex. Follow the stories to follow the money.
Read more


NC Redistricting 2017
New map, new districts, new lawmakers. Here’s what you need to know about gerrymandering in NC.
Read more