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Movement to remove Silent Sam continues to grow at UNC

As the N.C. Historical Commission studies its options and the UNC administration and Board of Governors lock horns over the issue, the movement to remove the “Silent Sam” Confederate monument from UNC’s Chapel Hill campus continues to gain momentum.

Last week UNC’s Department of Religious Studies became just the latest in a series of university departments to release a statement supporting removal.

The statement is brief but covers a lot of ground – connecting the study of religion to the issue, calling for administrative action and student protests of the statue as a “vital service.”

It is impossible to study religion without recognizing the importance of cultural, social, and political diversity, the enormous power of material objects, and the profound ways in which the past pervades the present. The Confederate monument known as “Silent Sam” exerts the ongoing power of white supremacy on our campus. As religious studies scholars, we are particularly aware that it was erected as an icon of social inequity and that white nationalist groups today have invested its presence on campus with sacred value.

In his 1913 speech dedicating the statue, Julian S. Carr celebrated the “sacrifice” of Confederate soldiers, the purity of “the Anglo Saxon” as a “Christian race,” and God’s providential blessing of the southern states in order to sanctify racial violence, a violence that continues today against racial, ethnic, and religious minorities. “Silent Sam” still enjoys the privilege of sacred space on this campus, not only raised high but also guarded by cameras, police, and sometimes barricades. Allowing this statue to remain in McCorkle Place contradicts the university’s policy on non-discrimination, which states that “The University is committed to providing an inclusive and welcoming environment.”

In her August 30th, 2017 email, Chancellor Carol Folt called on the campus community to “promote robust dialogue and debate” in an effort to encourage and protect free speech. In order to demonstrate its sincere commitment to the freedom of expression, the University must end its policies curtailing student activism around the statue and throughout the campus. Their material, embodied, and creative counter-narratives provide a vital service in challenging the legacy and ongoing threat of white supremacy.

The Department of Religious Studies calls for the removal of “Silent Sam” from McCorkle Place and the full protection of the student activists’ freedom of political expression.

“Silent Sam” is the only Confederate Monument on a UNC campus.

The Religious Studies statement joins those from a number of other departments, including  AnthropologyHistory, Art & Art History and English and Comparative Literature.

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