Legislative bill tracking: Former judge turned lawmaker keeping track of ‘war’ on judiciary

Trying to keep track of the major legislation over the last year that has been aimed at the judiciary?

Look no further than Rep. Joe John (D-Wake), one of two lawmakers in the General Assembly who used to be a judge. John, who was part of a panel last week at an NC Policy Watch Crucial Conversation event, put together a handout about bills that have been introduced and passed that affects North Carolina’s courts.

The document starts with House Bill 100, which was passed during a special session last year and makes judicial elections partisan. It ends with Senate Bill 698, a proposed constitutional amendment that would reduce all judges’ terms to two years and force them to run for reelection in 2018.

The document lists the status of each bill and links to media coverage about each one.

John has adamantly opposed legislation that chips away at the independence of the courts. He has called lawmakers’ attempts to manipulate the courts a “war,” and he recently wrote a Medium post about the “assault on our courts.”

See the full list below.

2016-2017 Judicial Bills by NC Policy Watch on Scribd

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