Education, News

Robeson County to transfer school to state’s controversial Innovative School District

Robeson school board Chair Peggy Wilkins-Chavis

In the end, the decision came down, at least partly, to pragmatism, says Peggy Wilkins-Chavis, chair of the Robeson County Board of Education.

Wilkins-Chavis’ board voted unanimously Tuesday to transfer control of a struggling elementary to North Carolina’s Innovative School District (ISD). It’s a hotly-contested new state initiative expected to cede operation of Southside-Ashpole Elementary in Rowland to a private charter or education management organization, including, potentially, a for-profit company.

The only option remaining to Robeson leaders under state law was closure, a route that nonetheless earned close scrutiny in late 2017.  But Wilkins-Chavis said the district would have been forced to displace more than 250 students, teachers, counselors and administrators across the district, potentially burdening other local schools that were lagging academically too.

“There were so many negative things,” she said. “And we don’t need to hurt schools that are struggling anyway.”

Southside-Ashpole Elementary will be the first North Carolina school to join the new program. The Rowland school was the final school standing after state officials last year narrowed down a list of 48 possible schools, eligible because of dismal test scores. Most, like Robeson County, served a low-income population, a group that tends to trail their peers in the classroom.

ISD Superintendent Eric Hall

ISD Superintendent Eric Hall is expected to recommend several more schools after a new round of testing data later this year.

Wilkins-Chavis expressed deep skepticism for the takeover program last year, although she said this week that she’s viewing the reform as a “new beginning” for Southside-Ashpole.

“If we can’t do it and Robeson County has failed and this company can come in and bring those test scores up, I’m 100 percent for it,” she said. “Because that’s our children of tomorrow. We need to have them on grade level.”

Hall is working with a consultant, Massachusetts-based School Works, to make a recommendation on the school’s new operator in February. Just two organizations—one a new Charlotte nonprofit and the other a Michigan for-profit, charter operator—submitted completed applications for the program, much to the chagrin of some members on the State Board of Education. More to come on that tomorrow from Policy Watch.

On Wednesday, Hall applauded Robeson school board members for their decision this week.

“Together we’re learning this new body of work,” he said. “It’s definitely been a journey and I’m very grateful to the board for taking that step.”

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