Environment, Governor Roy Cooper, Legislature

Another day, another violation for Chemours over GenX, PFOA contamination

The purple lines indicate Phase 4 of drinking water well testing near the Chemours Fayetteville
Works plant. DEQ is requiring the fourth phase because the agency has not yet found the
edge of the GenX contamination (Map: NCDEQ)

During a House floor debate last month on GenX legislation, Rep. Pat McElraft took an unusual stance: defending Chemours, the spin-off company of DuPont responsible for widespread pollution in drinking water and the Cape Fear River.

“Chemours is serious about cleaning up the contamination,” said McElraft, a Carteret County Republican. “Don’t blame Chemours totally. Maybe they made mistakes. They’re trying to do their best to do what’s right.”

There was no evidence to support that contention then, and there is even less now. DEQ released a letter today to Chemours detailing the company’s refusal to comply with the agency’s requests to control the release of perfluorinated and polyfluorinated compounds from its Fayetteville Works plant.

After groundwater tests on and near the Chemours plant showed high levels of PFOAs and PFOSs, DEQ sent the company a letter on Dec. 15, 2017, demanding that it implement “interim” measures to control the sources of contamination and stop the discharge. The company was also required to identify and address any hazards that occurred because of the contamination.

A month later Chemours responded, but failed to detail how it was stemming the discharge or controlling the sources, DEQ said. As a result, the agency is now requiring “immediate” measures to stop and clean up the pollutants. That includes excavating contaminated areas, cleaning potentially contaminated equipment, and reducing or eliminating air emissions that are contributing to the groundwater problems. Chemours has until Feb. 26 to tell DEQ what the company has done — and will continue to do — to meet the requirements.

DEQ could fine Chemours for failing to comply by the deadline.

DEQ scientists theorize that chemicals leaving the plant’s smokestacks are reacting with water — via rain or wet ground — and transforming into GenX. The contaminated water then drains into the soil and eventually pollutes the groundwater. That groundwater in turn, feeds private drinking water wells of households near the plant.

Chemours received permission yesterday from the Division of Air Quality to install a trial system to remove PFASs and PFOAs from air emissions. Any pollution captured by the filtration system must disposed offsite.

As for House Bill 189, the Senate failed to vote on it. Instead, senators rewrote the legislation, redirecting key funding for DEQ away from addressing the contamination. Instead, the agency would have to spend upward of $1.5 million on bureaucracy, including analyzing the last 43 years’ worth of wastewater discharge permits.

The House failed to vote on the Senate version this week, sending the bill to its River Quality Committee. That committee is scheduled to meet Wednesday, Feb. 21, at 9:30 a.m. in Room 643 of the Legislative Office Building.

Gov. Roy Cooper released a statement today expressing his ire for GOP lawmakers who “have gone home without doing anything to protect clean drinking water for North Carolina families.

“State environmental experts continue to hold Chemours accountable and are using all available resources to track the spread of GenX, and the latest notice of violation announced today shows the urgency. People in the Cape Fear region have a right to be angry that legislative leaders have failed to do their duty and give state scientists the tools they need to deal with GenX and other emerging contaminants.”

One Comment


  1. richard manyes

    February 14, 2018 at 5:40 am

    Perhaps Chemours should offer Cooper a “mitigation” fund to ensure they won’t need to worry about their permits? Maybe they already have.

Check Also

Duke Energy reporting another coal ash breach at Sutton; shuts down nat gas plant

The Cape Fear River has overtopped a dam ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

It’s still not clear exactly how much damage Hurricane Florence left in her wake, but "the show [...]

When the Silent Sam Confederate Statue was toppled at UNC-Chapel Hill last month, a flurry of text m [...]

Having devastated the southeast coast of North Carolina, Hurricane Florence is now a tropical depres [...]

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights has finally released its report and recommendations on minority [...]

As an OB/GYN caring for the women and families of North Carolina, I know abortion is a safe, essenti [...]

It’s a truism that weather affects elections. Yes, many of us would slosh through a downpour if that [...]

To this point, everything about Brett Kavanaugh -- from his indoctrination in  Kenneth Starr's [...]

On June 6, 1944, the day of the great Allied Forces D-Day invasion of France, many historians agree [...]