Commentary

Join us next Wednesday for a discussion of reproductive freedom

Join us next Wednesday, February 28 for a very special Crucial Conversation luncheon –

The Hyde Amendment at age 41: The path forward in the fight for reproductive freedom for low-income women

Click here to register.

The Hyde Amendment was first introduced by an anti-abortion congressman in 1976 as a way to explicitly bar low-income people from accessing abortion care, and it’s been a provision tacked onto the federal budget ever since. For 41 years, legal and safe abortion has been the only type of health care stigmatized and politically targeted in this way.

And for 41 years, the tentacles of the Hyde Amendment have grown. In North Carolina in 2018, no federal, state, county or local government employees can obtain coverage for abortion care through their employee benefits; and North Carolina residents who access their health care through the military, Indian Health Services or the United State Peace Corps volunteer program cannot have an abortion covered through that insurance. State lawmakers have even forced private health insurers that offer plans on the Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace to drop abortion coverage.

With the procedure typically starting around $500, plus potential travel, child care and lost work costs, many low-income patients seeking an abortion are forced to scramble to come up with the money needed to access this common, safe and legal medical procedure.

So, where do things stand and what is the path forward in the battle to restore and guarantee reproductive freedom for all?

Join us as we tackle these and other urgent and timely questions with representatives of three of our state’s leading advocacy groups for reproductive freedom:

Omisade Burney-Scott of Sister Song, Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective. Sister Song’s mission is to strengthen and amplify the collective voices of indigenous women and women of color to achieve reproductive justice by eradicating reproductive oppression and securing human rights.

Marles Earle of the Carolina Abortion Fund, a volunteer-run nonprofit that provides financial assistance to North Carolinians who choose to have an abortion but cannot afford the full cost.

Tara Romano of NARAL Pro-Choice North Carolina, a statewide advocacy organization that works to ensure all North Carolinians can make the reproductive health care decisions they need, including preventing pregnancy, carrying a pregnancy to term safely, and terminating a pregnancy.

When: Wednesday, February 28th, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. (At the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s streets)

Click here for parking info.

Space is limited – preregistration requiredClick here to register.

Cost: $15, admission includes a box lunch. Scholarships available.

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com

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