News

Window closing for public comment on Confederate statues

The N.C. Historical Commission’s Confederate Monument Study Committee will take comments from the public for one more week.

In a telephone meeting Thursday afternoon, the committee voted to end public comment at midnight on April 12.

At issue are three Confederate monuments on the capitol grounds and a request from Gov. Roy Cooper that they be removed.

The statues are:

  • The 75-foot Capitol Confederate Monument, erected in 1895, which commemorates North Carolina’s “Confederate dead.”
  • The Henry Lawson Wyatt Monument, erected in 1912, which commemorates the first Confederate soldier killed in the Civil War combat at the Battle of Bethel on June 10, 1861.
  • The Monument to North Carolina Women of the Confederacy, erected in 1914.

A law passed by the N.C. General Assembly in 2015   makes it more difficult to remove such statues or “objects of remembrance.”

That law was passed in response to a growing movement to move or remove Confederate monuments. The law makes such requests the business of the Historical Commission, which appointed a committee to study the issue.

Last month the committee heard comments at a public meeting attended by about 60 people – most of whom spoke in favor of keeping the monuments where they are.

The commission has heard much more from the public online, where it has so far received 4,682 public comments through an online portal created to get feedback.

Another part of the committee’s charge: getting input from historical experts and legal advice from the law schools at Duke University, Elon University, N.C. Central, UNC-Chapel Hill, Wake Forest University, Campbell University and from the UNC School of government.  The committee heard on Thursday that of those, so far, only the UNC School of Government has responded to the committee’s request to weigh in.

The full commission will meet next month and is expected to hear a report from the Confederate monument task force.

4 Comments


  1. Wade Stamper

    April 9, 2018 at 12:36 pm

    The confederate monuments should be left alone. This is a part of North Carolina history and I believe the citizens should be reminded of our anchestors. If these monuments are removed then all racists statues should come down as well.

  2. Wanda Stamper

    April 9, 2018 at 12:42 pm

    I believe the confederate monuments should be left where they stand. This is a reminder of our past and we should honor their names. If these monuments are removed then the monuments honoring Martin Luther King Jr should be removed. I am not proud of all the history of my ancestors but I believe we should be reminded so that the next generation does not follow the same path.

  3. Beth Carr

    April 9, 2018 at 1:16 pm

    The statues honoring the Confederacy should be dismantled and removed from the Capitol grounds. Until we deal honestly with some very wrongful periods of our history (slavery and treatment of Native Americans among the most egregious), we will continue to support a wrongful culture of white privilege.

  4. Francisco del Valle

    April 12, 2018 at 12:42 pm

    I think they need to stay where they are, NOTHING will change our history like it on not, and the governor has never right to change that.

Check Also

North Carolinians Against Gun Violence launches action fund

North Carolinians Against Gun Violence is launching a ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

It’s still not clear exactly how much damage Hurricane Florence left in her wake, but "the show [...]

When the Silent Sam Confederate Statue was toppled at UNC-Chapel Hill last month, a flurry of text m [...]

Having devastated the southeast coast of North Carolina, Hurricane Florence is now a tropical depres [...]

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights has finally released its report and recommendations on minority [...]

As an OB/GYN caring for the women and families of North Carolina, I know abortion is a safe, essenti [...]

It’s a truism that weather affects elections. Yes, many of us would slosh through a downpour if that [...]

To this point, everything about Brett Kavanaugh -- from his indoctrination in  Kenneth Starr's [...]

On June 6, 1944, the day of the great Allied Forces D-Day invasion of France, many historians agree [...]