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CANCELLED: Judicial redistricting, reform meeting re-set for end of month

If you were planning to delve back in to GOP lawmakers’ plans to redistrict the judiciary today, go ahead and cross it off your calendar.

The Joint Select Committee on Judicial Reform and Redistricting cancelled it’s 1 p.m. meeting today and rescheduled it for 9:30 a.m. Friday, April 27.

There’s no word on why the meeting was cancelled and the committee co-chairs — Representatives Justin Burr (R-Stanly, Montgomery) and David Lewis (R-Harnett) and Senators Dan Bishop (R-Mecklenburg), Warren Daniel (R-Burke, Cleveland) and Bill Rabon (Bladen) — never responded to an email asking why the meeting was scheduled in the first place.

The short legislative session this year starts May 16, and it is expected that lawmakers will vote on some sort of judicial reform, whether it be new judicial maps or a merit selection plan that would rid the state of judicial elections altogether.

Committee meetings are open to the public.

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