Courts & the Law, Defending Democracy, News

Partisan gerrymandering plaintiffs ask U.S. Supreme Court to affirm lower ruling

The plaintiff’s in North Carolina’s partisan gerrymandering case have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to affirm the lower court’s decision striking down a 2016 congressional map.

The high court denied an expedited briefing in the case but could still affirm the court’s decision and order fair maps to be drawn, according to a news release from the Southern Coalition for Social Justice (SCSJ).

The Campaign Legal Center (CLC), SCSJ and University of Chicago Professor Nicholas Stephanopoulos represent the plaintiffs in League of Women Voters of North Carolina v. Rucho. They jointly filed the brief on behalf of their clients, the League of Women Voters of North Carolina and 12 individual North Carolina voters.

That case and Common Cause v. Rucho led to the partisan gerrymandering opinion from the lower court.

“The district court unanimously and correctly found that North Carolina lawmakers manipulated the state’s congressional voting maps to lock in their own political party’s power, with little regard for the will of voters,” said Paul Smith, vice president at CLC. “North Carolina has one of the most severely gerrymandered maps in modern American history. North Carolina voters have endured three election cycles with a skewed congressional map. The Supreme Court must affirm the lower court’s ruling, because even a single election under an unconstitutional map is one too many.”

Smith argued the partisan gerrymandering case out of Wisconsin, Gill v. Whitford, before the Supreme Court on October 3. There has not yet been an opinion handed down in that case, which is expected to set precedent.

Allison Riggs, senior voting rights attorney for SCSJ said they are hopeful the high court recognizes the “glaring unconstitutionality” of North Carolina’s plan.

“The congressional maps drawn in North Carolina would be unconstitutional under virtually any meaningful legal standard the court adopts,” she said.

Evidence presented at the trial in 2017 showed that Republican legislative leaders used political data in drawing the 2016 congressional map to gain specific partisan advantage. You can read more about that here.

Check Also

‘Campaign finance watchdog’ calling for investigation into Court of Appeals Judge Phil Berger Jr.’s past report

A former executive director of Democracy North Carolina ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

Billy Houston, who is under state investigation for allegedly falsified hog lagoon samples in Duplin [...]

As a former police officer and firefighter, Wesley Sewell has encountered odors so putrid that they [...]

When Sarah Jessenia Lopez plead guilty last month to attempted notary fraud related to bail bonding, [...]

Early voting in North Carolina is a big deal with a big turnout, but advocates are bracing for a neg [...]

“How long before we say enough is enough?” state lawmaker Ted Davis Jr. asked his colleagues in the [...]

Like so many people in this state and across this country, I have not gotten over my funk regarding [...]

The easiest way to push back against NC’s rogue General Assembly is to vote against all six proposed [...]

The post It’s getting deep… appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]