Courts & the Law, Defending Democracy, News

Cooper nominates special Superior Court judges for confirmation

Gov. Roy Cooper nominated three people this week to special Superior Court judgeships.

He submitted the names of Chief District Court Judge J. Stanley Carmical, Bryan Beatty and Chief District Court Judge Athena Brooks to the General Assembly for confirmation.

Carmical currently serves Robeson County and Brooks serves Henderson, Polk and Transylvania counties. Beatty has served as a Commissioner for the North Carolina Utilities Commission for nearly a decade and was previously secretary of Crime Control and Public Safety and Director of the State Bureau of Investigation.

“These nominees bring extensive experience in our justice system to these new roles and are highly qualified to serve as Special Superior Court judges,” Cooper said in a news release. “I’m grateful for these individuals’ willingness to assume this important responsibility for the State of North Carolina.”

Special Superior Court judges are not required to live in the district they hold court (they can be sent to anywhere in the state) and they are appointed by the governor to five-year terms. Some special Superior Court judges are also appointed to hear business court cases.

The judges have the same power and authority as a regular Superior Court judge. Their starting salary is also the same, $132,584, according to the N.C. Administrative Office of the Courts.

By state statute, the General Assembly must confirm the special Superior Court nominees by joint resolution of both chambers.

Check Also

Local voting rights attorney featured in Teen Vogue series

Anyone who has ever wanted a peek into ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

Nearly half of the female students at UNC-Chapel Hill have experienced some form of sexual assault b [...]

Despite concerns, Treasurer Dale Folwell maintains state investments in much-criticized company that [...]

If you only look at the unemployment rate and the stock market, you probably think most families are [...]

It’s a strikingly familiar tale in North Carolina: voters are waiting with bated breath for a court [...]

When the journalist Michael Kinsley wrote in 1984 that a gaffe “is when a politician tells the truth [...]

Tonight's Democratic presidential debate will be dominated by two urgent issues: the House of R [...]

Supporters of public education fight back against empty promises of state’s school privatization mov [...]

Survey of hold-out states indicates the Medicaid expansion debate has entered a new phase Across the [...]