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Tomorrow: Trial over judicial primaries begins in Greensboro

A trial over lawmakers’ cancellation of the 2018 judicial primaries will begin tomorrow in federal court in Greensboro.

The North Carolina Democratic party sued lawmakers and the state alleging the elimination infringed upon their First and 14th Amendment rights to Freedom of Association, or the rights of groups to take collective action to pursue the interests of its members.

You can read more about the elimination of the judicial primaries here.

The primaries had been reinstated by U.S. District Court Judge Catherine Eagles as part of a preliminary injunction but then the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals cancelled them again in a decision that was not unanimous.

Candidate filing for judicial elections begins June 18. Lawmakers are still sorting through plans for judicial redistricting in part of the state.

The hearing in Greensboro is set to begin at 9:30 a.m. and is open to the public. Electronics are not permitted in the courtroom and members of the public who attend the hearing will be required to show courthouse officials their photo identification.

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