Environment

Dozens of rivers forecast to crest at record levels tonight through end of week

Located between Jacksonville and Goldsboro, a mansion and its grounds are flooded after Hurricane Florence on Monday, Sept. 17, 2018. (Photo: Lisa Sorg)

Two days after the worst of Hurricane Florence hit North Carolina, and many rivers are cresting at record levels throughout eastern and southeastern parts of the state. This has prompted evacuations of thousands of peoples from their homes, including in Wilmington, New Bern, Fayetteville and Lumberton.

According to the National Weather Service, 10 river gauges in North Carolina have shown major flooding. Other river levels in the moderate and minor category could be upgraded over the next several days.

Here are the expected peak times, the forecast levels and for comparison, the historical records, designated in parentheses:

Tuesday evening/Wednesday

  • Northeast Cape Fear River near Burgaw: 25.4 feet (22.5)
  • NE Cape Fear near Chinquapin: 27.2 (23.5)
  • Contentnea Creek at Hookerton: 18.2 (18.05)
  • Neuse River near Goldsboro: 27 (29.7)
  • Little River at Manchester: 36.6 (32.2)*
  • Cape Fear River at Fayetteville: 61.6 (68.9)
  • Cape Fear River at Huske Lock 69 (75.5)
  • Lumber River at Lumberton 24.3 (record not listed, but flood stage is 13 feet) Cape Fear River at Elizabethtown 39.9 (43.2)

 

A neighborhood in Jacksonville (Photo: Lisa Sorg)

 

 

Friday night/Saturday

  • Cape Fear River at Lock 1: 29.7 feet (29.8)
  • Neuse River at Kinston: 24.6 (28.3)*The most recent gauge reading is 35.95, recorded yesterday. However, the operating limits of the gauge have either been exceeded and/or flood water has damaged the gauge.

Major flooding is indicated by purple circles; red is moderate and orange, minor. (National Weather Service)

 

One Comment


  1. Ann Ehringhaus

    September 18, 2018 at 3:15 pm

    Would you like to mention that the fall equinox causes astronomical high tides, as does any full moon, and this year they are 3 days apart!?!…Sept 22 and 25…this will help to maintain unusually high tides for a bit longer. We are influenced by the moon. People who live at the beach are aware of this.

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