Commentary

Some quick facts about Veterans Day

Image: NC Dept. of Veterans & Military Affairs

CNN has posted a handy infographic about Veterans Day that includes some quick and important facts about the holiday. The following was adapted from that post:

#1 – It’s celebrated annually on November 11, the anniversary of the end of World War I (yesterday was the 100th anniversary).

#2 – There are 19.6 million veterans in the U.S. , which equals about one of of 15 people.

#3 – 9.2 million vets are over the age of 65.

#4 – There are 1.9 million female veterans.

#5 – Veterans Day was originally known as Armistice Day — President Woodrow Wilson signed the proclamation in 1919. The word “veterans” replaced the word “armistice” by an act of Congress in 1954.

#6 – For a brief period during the early 70’s the holiday was moved to late October.

#7 – The date was moved back to Nov. 11 in 1978.

For more information on veterans in North Carolina, check out the website of the Department of Military & Veterans Affairs at https://www.milvets.nc.gov/.

 

Check Also

Calls mount for a new election in the 9th District

There were new and powerful editorials over the ...

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

Global carbon dioxide emissions are predicted to hit a record high this year, yet the Trump administ [...]

Midway through Robert Thaxton’s closing arguments in the recent hog nuisance trial, the attorney for [...]

It was clear during two hours of debate Wednesday where the two political parties at the legislature [...]

Michael Dunsmore, superintendent of Wayne County Public Schools, has one question for members of the [...]

The post The newest nuisance in the 9th: Election Fraud Scandal appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

Earlier this week, the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees (BoT) began plans to erect a statue dedicat [...]

At some point, you would think the embarrassment factor would kick in for North Carolina Republican [...]

The post Something smells in the 9th district race… appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]