Commentary

Grinch remark spurs schoolteacher to provide Sen. Bill Rabon a lesson in Dr. Seuss

As Melissa Boughton reported yesterday in the post below, Republican Sen. Bill Rabon attacked Gov. Cooper yesterday for not moving fast enough to suit Rabon on some bills that he and his buddies at the legislature had sent over to the mansion as a kind of early Christmas gift. Rabon thinks Cooper is acting like the Grinch in the famous Dr. Seuss Christmas story because his failure to act immediately on the GOP bills is supposedly keeping some legislative staffers and journalists from getting on with their end-of-year vacations.

Setting aside the absurdity of the GOP attack — as Raleigh’s News & Observer reported, even former Republican state Rep. Charles Jeter pointed out that it is his fellow Republicans who are responsible for the end-of-year session that’s infringing on the holidays — Rabon and the Senate crew might want tread carefully when attempting to cite Dr. Seuss as a source. As one of the legislature’s most frequent and insightful critics, Forsyth County school teacher Stuart Egan, noted yesterday on his blog, Caffeinated Rage, Seuss had a lot more to say in his books about people like Rabon and his fellow conservatives than he did about governors who take their time in carefully considering rushed legislation.  This is from “Sen. Bill Rabon’s Seussian Problem”:

If Sen. Bill Rabon is going to start using Seussian allusions, then he might want to make sure he’s read more than one Seuss book….

The irony of what Rabon said concerning Cooper’s “lack” of action almost amounts to the hubris displayed by King Derwin in Bartholomew and the Ooblek. Here is a man who as part of a lame duck special session called for to address matters that could have been handled in the next scheduled legislative session calling someone a “grinch” because he is being “partisan.”

But maybe if Sen. Rabon wants to use Seuss as a means to describe what is happening in North Carolina, he could at least open up some more of Seuss’s books. He could think of it as a remedy for an ailment of ignorance much like juice of the flower found on the Zinniga-Zanniga tree.

Egan then goes on to examine five of Seuss’s books — with the help from a 2009 article in the magazine Mental Floss by author Stacy Conradt — that show the kind of pontificating blowhards that Seuss usually skewered in his stories. Each of the stories — The LoraxGreen Eggs and Ham, Horton Hears a Who, Oh the Places You’ll Go and The Big Brag is about speaking truth to destructive and know-it-all powers that be — people who are all strongly reminiscent of the GOP leadership in the General Assembly.

As Egan notes in conclusion after urging Rabon to catch up on his Seuss:

Maybe in the time that Cooper is allowed to legally weigh what is best for North Caroline, Sen. Rabon could catch up on more Seuss.

And even realize that the Grinch does do the right thing in the end. For everybody.

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