NC Budget and Tax Center

State ‘millionaires’ taxes’ can fund key investments without harming state economies

State income tax increases on high-income residents can raise substantial revenues for investments in people and communities and are more likely to boost long-term productivity than harm short-term economic growth, according to a new report from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP).

The facts about state millionaires’ taxes

  • States have increased their top income tax rates without harming their economies.
  • Over the last 18 years, 15 of the 20 major studies examining states’ income taxes found little to no effect on their economic growth.
  • Millionaire tax flight is uncommon and, therefore, does not weaken state economies. Less than three percent of millionaire households moved to new states in a given year.
  • High-income tax increases can help North Carolinians afford investments that decrease racial inequities, build economic opportunity, and spur growth, such as high-quality education, improved support for low-income families, and better roads and other infrastructure.

Millionaires in North Carolina have been benefiting from tax cuts since 2013. Before then, there was a graduated rate structure on personal income that taxed higher incomes at higher rates. In the first round of tax cuts in 2013, that was reduced to a flat tax rate of 5.75 percent. Since then, the tax rate has continued to be reduced and as of January 1, 2019, it stands at 5.25 percent.  Since 2013, 75 percent of the net tax cuts have flowed to the top 1 percent of income earners in North Carolina; the average annual income for those taxpayers during that time was nearly $1 million.

As of November 2018, there is now a cap of seven percent on income tax rates in the state constitution. Millionaires are the primary beneficiaries as they receive more than 50 percent of the total net tax cut from the inability to raise rates to prior levels on higher income.  A millionaires’ tax in North Carolina at the capped seven percent rate could raise revenue for meaningful investments that ensure our children are ready to learn and reading by 3rd grade, connect people to health care, and allow our workers to upgrade their skills for emerging industries.

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