Education

Annual report shows decrease in reportable crimes, slight increase in short-term suspensions

Crimes reported by North Carolina high schools dropped by 87 last school year — a 1.6 percent decrease, according to a new state report.

The State Board of Education will discuss the Consolidated Data Report, 2017-18 during its March 6 business meeting.

The report shows that reported acts of school crime and violence dropped to 9,747 from 9,834, while the number of criminal acts per 100 students fell from 6.48 to 6.41.

The 16 criminal acts North Carolina’s school districts are required to report included, homicide, assault resulting in serious bodily injury, assault involving the use of a weapon, rape, sexual offense, sexual assault, kidnapping, robbery with a dangerous weapon, taking indecent liberties with a minor, assault on school personnel, bomb threat, burning of a school building, possession of alcoholic beverage, possession of controlled substance in violation of law, possession of a firearm or powerful explosive, possession of a weapon.

The most reported crimes committed by high schools were possession of a controlled substance in violation of the law, possession of a weapon excluding firearms and powerful explosives and possession of an alcoholic beverage.

While reported crimes overall decreased, there was an uptick in the number of firearms found on school campuses. The number grew by 23, from 105 to 128. That’s a 21 percent increase.

The Consolidated Data Report also includes the state’s annual report on school suspensions.

Short-term suspensions lasting 10 days or less increased 1.3 percent, from 208,539 during the 2016-17 school year to 211,228 last year.

Meanwhile, long-term suspensions of 11 days or more decreased from 3.2 percent, from 695 to 673.

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