“Divine Nine” advocates press state lawmakers for change

Nicole Dozier speaks at today’s press conference, flanked by other Divine Nine representatives, including Rep. Jean Farmer-Butterfield at left

The North Carolina Divine Nine, a group of nine historically African-American Panhellenic fraternities and sororities, held a press conference today at the General Assembly to announce the group’s advocacy agenda for the 2019-2020 year.

Tejuan Manners, district director of the Association of North Carolina Alphamen, described six areas of emphasis in the group’s policy agenda: criminal justice reform, voting reform, accessible health care, improved public education, economic empowerment and housing justice and assuring a full count in the 2020 Census.

Nicole Dozier, director of the Health Advocacy Project at the North Carolina Justice Center (the parent organization of NC Policy Watch), specifically addressed the importance of closing the Medicaid coverage gap while decrying the decision of state legislative leaders to keep North Carolina in what she called the “mean-spirited minority” that have refused to expand the program.

In exploring some of the details of the six priorities, Manners gave particular emphasis to securing full public access to all police body camera footage and the group’s demand that North Carolina enact a program providing for automatic voter registration for all North Carolinians when they reach their 18th birthday.

Rep. Jean Farmer-Butterfield (D-Wilson) and Sen. Mujtaba Mohammed (D-Mecklenburg) were present at the press conference and praised the North Carolina Divine Nine for their consistent commitment to political advocacy in the state.

This press conference was part of the fourth annual North Carolina Divine Nine Legislative Day. Organizers estimated attendance at today’s event at over 600.

Aditi Kharod is a student at UNC Chapel Hill and an intern at NC Policy Watch.

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

With nearly 200 active COVID cases among students and staff, board will revisit mask mandate Monday [...]

Like millions of women, Sarah Anderson saw her income drop during the pandemic when her two part-tim [...]

Proposals would fund universal pre-K and free community college, hasten shift to renewable energy WA [...]

Last week, the Prison Policy Initiative published a report – "States of Incarceration: The Glob [...]

Vaccine refusal is a major reason COVID-19 infections continue to surge in the U.S. Safe and effecti [...]

Abortion is a common and normal part of the range of reproductive healthcare services that people ha [...]

Zac Campbell paused suddenly and took a minute to gather himself, while colleagues shuffled toward h [...]

Read the story by reporter Lisa Sorg here. The post Clear and present danger: Burlington’s Tarheel A [...]

A Clear and Present Danger

 

NC’s Tarheel Army Missile Plant is a toxic disgrace
Read the two-part story about the Army’s failure to clean up hazardous chemicals, which have contaminated a Black and Hispanic neighborhood for 30 years.

Read in English.


Haga clic aquí para leer: Peligro inminente
Una antigua planta de misiles del Ejército ha contaminado un vecindario negro y latino durante 30 años.

Leer en español.