Education, News, Trump Administration

Elizabeth Warren releases new education plan, includes $450 billion in federal aid

Sen. Elizabeth Warren

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a favorite for the Democratic nomination for president, is famous for her plans.

Education Week reports Warren has a plan for education now too, and it includes $450 billion in new federal aid for “disadvantaged students.”

The plan is likely to draw a sharp contrast with President Donald Trump’s administration, which has made funding for school choice and privatization programs a priority.

Education is not grabbing the headlines in this election, given the near constant stream of conversation about impeachment, espionage and whistle-blowers. But it should be, given the enormous impact it will have on states.

Here’s a portion of Education Week‘s report on the Warren plan. For the full report, visit Education Week.

Massachusetts senator and 2020 presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren is proposing a K-12 education plan that includes $450 billion in new federal aid over 10 years to disadvantaged students, changing the way that money is allocated in order to ensure underfunded schools get more, and more than doubling funding in special education grants by increasing aid by $20 billion a year.

In addition, Warren’s plan would direct billions of dollars a year in federal money to promote public school integration, and aims to help 25,000 public schools transition to the community schools model, which provides health and other wraparound services to help students and their communities. She also wants to eliminate “high-stakes testing” and authorize new legal requirement that teachers can organize and collectively bargain in every state.

Her campaign released “A Great Public School Education for Every Student”on Monday. In this plan, Warren also reiterated her previous pledge to appoint a person with public school teaching experience to be education secretary. She also wants to end federal funding for charter school expansion, and to allow only local school districts to authorize charter schools.

On the technology side, she wants to revamp federal law to “ban the sharing, storing, and sale of student data that includes names or other information that can identify individual students.” She also takes a shot at tech giants like Facebook and Google by saying she’ll “crack down” on data mining practices that take place in schools.

Warren’s plan would require huge changes in how the U.S. Department of Education does business, and Congress would have to sign off on key elements. Politically speaking, it’s hard to see how much of want she wants gets over the finish line; lawmakers would have to agree to revise several key elements of the Every Student Succeeds Act, for example. But it sends a clear signal to Democratic voters and key power players in the party, especially the teachers’ unions, about her intentions and how much she would depart not just from the Trump administration, but from the Obama administration as well.

“As public school teachers across the country know, our schools do not have the financial resources they need to deliver a quality public education for every child. That’s why my plan invests hundreds of billions of dollars in our public schools—paid for by a two-cent wealth tax on fortunes above $50 million,” Warren said in a statement accompanying the plan.

One Comment


  1. Stewart

    October 22, 2019 at 11:25 am

    It is an excellent plan that eliminates the focus that federal policy has had on promoting charter schools. It gets us back to a system where it is the public schools that are supported by the government and private schools (including charters) are excluded and held accountable for what they may do with any public monies that may come their way. This is a plan that teachers can get behind whole-heartedly.

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