Education

Achievement Schools District in Tennessee seeks ‘restart’ after failing to improve schools

The state-run school district in Tennessee, the one on which this state’s Innovative School District (ISD) is modeled, has failed.

According to reports out of Tennessee, the Achievement School District (ASD), is working on a plan to return 30 ASD schools in Memphis and Nashville to their local districts by 2022.

State officials in Tennessee contend the district, which was established in 2012 to improve achievement in low-performing schools, “grew too quickly” and that “demand outpaced supply and capacity.”

Still, Tennessee officials aren’t giving up on the ASD. They’re billing the new proposal as a “reset” of the district, which has fallen short of its goals to move low-performing schools from the bottom 5 percent and into the top 25 percent.

Most ASD schools were handed over to charter school operators after being pulled from local districts.

“The Achievement School District remains a necessary intervention in Tennessee’s school framework when other local interventions have proven to be unsuccessful in improving outcomes for students,” officials said in a presentation obtained by Chalkbeat.

“The Commercial Appeal” in Memphis reports that most of the schools remain the bottom 5 percent and that several have closed due to low enrollment. Teacher retention has also been a major challenge, the paper reports.

Meanwhile, North Carolina’s ISD has struggled to get off the ground.

After only one year, state officials made wholesale leadership changes at ISD. The ISD got a new superintendent, the lone ISD school got a new principal and a new president was hired to lead the private firm that manages the school.

James Ellerbe, the ISD superintendent hired in July, reported this week that there are 69 schools on the state’s 2019 qualifying list, meaning the low-performing schools are at risk of being swept into the ISD.

The ISD will bring only one school into the state-run district next year. The school with the lowest performance score among Title I schools in the bottom 5 percent will be brought into the ISD.

The ISD was approved in 2016 by state lawmakers even though the ASD had showed little signs of success after being in business four years.

The ISD’s chief proponent, then-Rep. Rob Bryan, a Republican from Mecklenburg, argued that the new school district would provide much-needed reforms in chronically low-performing schools even as he acknowledged the results were mixed for Tennessee’s ASD.

Bryan is currently serving out the term of former state senator Dan Bishop. He could not be reached for comment Friday.

Teachers and other opponents vigorously argued against the ISD.

Mark Jewell, president of the N.C. Association of Educators, called it a “new layer of bureaucracy that lacks the accountability to ensure public dollars are being spent effectively.”

Check Also

State Board of Education takes on racism in response to civil unrest

Racism is a “social pandemic” in conflict with the nation’s founding ...

State and Federal COVID-19 policy updates

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

Powerful Black leaders across North Carolina in charge of administering justice are speaking out to [...]

A confidential letter delivered to the State Board of Education alleges that the school management f [...]

Historic congressional hearing examines the pandemic's disparate racial and ethnic impacts WASH [...]

At the end of an hour-long question-and-answer session with UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Kevin Guskiew [...]

It needs to be acknowledged at the very outset of this column that there is, of course, no way that [...]

It has been eight days since Minneapolis resident George Floyd, a Black man, was killed by Derek Cha [...]

The post Tarred Heel. appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

Yesterday – the 75th Memorial Day since the end of World War II (and the first in more than century [...]