public health, race

NC has one of the worst records in the nation for the deaths of black babies. An expert panel offers some solutions at next week’s Crucial Conversation.

Image: Adobe Stock

North Carolina has one of the worst records in the nation for the deaths of babies a year or younger, according to new reporting by Lynn Bonner of Raleigh’s News & Observer. The rate of Black babies’ deaths is driving that statistic.

Statewide, Bonner reports, the gap between Black and white infant deaths was wider in 2018 than it was in 1999. Black infants born in North Carolina are now more than twice as likely to die than white infants. The state has acknowledged it won’t meet its goals for reducing that gap by this year.

Join us for breakfast next Tuesday, February 11 at 8:00 a.m. for an in-depth conversation with Bonner about her seven-month reporting project. Bonner will be joined by an expert panel to discuss the extent of the crisis and how North Carolina can do better for its Black infants, including:

Whitney Tucker, who is the Research Director at NC Child. There, she leads the organization’s research on child wellbeing and provides actionable analyses of public policies impacting NC children and families. Tucker also engages in research for academic publication, with special interests in advocacy evaluation and policy tools advancing racial and ethnic equity.

Rebecca Cerese is the Engagement Coordinator for the N.C. Justice Center’s Health Advocacy Project where she uses her experience as a documentary filmmaker and producer to find and capture compelling stories that highlight the many North Carolinians struggling to access quality, affordable health care, especially those who fall in the Medicaid Coverage Gap.

Tina Sherman, Campaign Director for the Breastfeeding and Paid Leave Campaigns at MomsRising, has dedicated her professional life to supporting and empowering moms and families. Among many other things, she has served as a legislative aide in the United States Senate and worked with several child and women’s advocacy organizations.

When: Tuesday, February 11 at 8:00 a.m.
Where: North Carolina Justice Center offices – 224 S. Dawson St., in Raleigh
Space is limited – preregistration is requested.
Cost: $10 for those who pay online, $15 at the door; scholarships available. Click here to register.
Note: Online sign-up page will list the “pay at the door” option as “free,” but the actual, event-day cost is $15

Questions?? Contact Melissa Boughton at 919- 861-1454 or [email protected]

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