UNC-TV provides educational programming to keep North Carolina children learning while schools are closed

North Carolina’s public school are closed due to the COVID-19 crisis but students can continue to learn by watching UNC-TV.

The state’s public television station has begun to air programming for students in grades 4-12  to complement remote learning opportunities provided by North Carolina schools.

The programs are designed for use by parents, caregivers and educators while schools are closed. The state’s public schools will remain closed until May 15, or longer.

Educational programming is available online, on air and through PBS LearningMedia for students in pre-kindergarten through high school .

N.C. Department of Public Instruction will link online and printable material and activity ideas that complement the UNC-TV lessons. Districts are encouraged to print the materials and the programming schedule to distribute at meal sites or mail to students.

“We’re excited about this additional learning resource for students and families during this challenging time across our state and nation,” said Angie Mullennix, director of innovation strategy and interim director of K-12 standards, curriculum and instruction for DPI. “We thank UNC-TV for working with us to help fill the gap left by the unfortunate, but necessary, school closures.”

UNC-TV’s educational programming block will be available over the air and streamed live at unctv.org/athomelearning. The programming is available Monday-Friday, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., for grades 4-8 and from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., for grades 9-12 (actual times may vary, please check the weekly schedule online at unctv.org/ahl).

Additional programming for children in grades pre-K through third grade is available on UNC-TV’s Rootle 24/7 PBS KIDS channel, as well as weekdays during a seven-hour block, from 6:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., on UNC-TV.

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