Higher Ed, Legislature, News

One year after UNC-Charlotte shooting, ads call out legislature for inaction on gun laws

One year after the campus shooting that killed two and injured four at UNC-Charlotte, gun safety advocates are launching a new online ad campaign to highlight the General Assembly’s failure to pass new gun laws.

“More than 1,300 North Carolinians have been shot and killed, and twice that wounded, in the year since gun violence shook UNC Charlotte to its core,” said Grace McClain, volunteer leader with the North Carolina chapter of Moms Demand Action, part of the national Everytown for Gun Safety organization. “The response from our lawmakers? Crickets. So with these new ads, we’re letting them know that their failure to act not only costs lives – it’ll cost them their seats, too.”

On Monday the Everytown for Gun Safety Action Fund launched a new digital video ad titled “A Year of Inaction” as part of a $250,000 campaign to push for stricter gun safety laws.

The ad will run on Facebook and is part of a $60 million effort to elect candidates who support stronger gun laws in November.

The ads will ask viewers to visit a site that allows them to sign on to a pledge to vote with gun safety in mind in November.

Most North Carolinians are already for stronger gun laws, the group said in a press release this week. It points to its poll, released in January, showing 79% of North Carolina voters in its survey support stronger gun laws. 

In the poll, 75% of respondents said they were less likely to vote for a candidate who supports allowing people convicted of domestic violence to own guns. Sixty percent also said they would be less likely to vote for a candidate  who opposes “red flag” laws that would allow police to confiscate weapons from those found by a judge to be an extreme danger to themselves or others. Nearly 70% said they were less likely to support a candidate who is against background checks for all gun sales.

Despite those numbers, new gun laws have gotten traction in the Republican dominated General Assembly.

Last year Democrats in the N.C. House again introduced new gun bills. Like all such bills they have introduced since the 2012 mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., the bills didn’t even get a vote.

One Comment


  1. Steve White

    May 12, 2020 at 8:18 am

    I don’t believe the 2nd Amendment was intended to say ANYONE CAN HAVE ANY OR AS MANY GUNS THEY WANT, IT WAS INTENDED TO ALLOW PEOPLE TO FORM A MILITIA TO PROTECT PEOPLE AND THE COUNTRY, NOT AS PROPS FOR INTIMIDATION AND TERRORIZING PEOPLE.
    PLEASE PAS SOME SENSIBLE GUN CONTROL LAWS.

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