COVID-19, News

Governor Cooper extends moratorium on evictions, utility shut-offs

Governor Roy Cooper took action Saturday to extend a moratorium on utility shut-offs and evictions as the state works to combat further spread of the coronavirus.

“North Carolinians need relief to help make ends meet during the pandemic,” said Governor Cooper. “Extending housing and utility protections will mean more people can stay in their homes and stay safe as we all work to slow the spread of this virus.”

The Executive Order received full support from the Council of State, according to the governor’s office.

“North Carolinians want to pay their rent, but for far too many people – through no fault of their own – that’s just not possible right now,” said Attorney General Josh Stein in a press release. “We are in unprecedented times that call for unprecedented action. I support Gov. Roy Cooper’s extension of the moratorium on evictions to ensure that people do not face homelessness in the midst of this health and economic crisis.”

Here’s more on how the new order will impact will impact North Carolinians struggling to make ends meet during the pandemic.

The Order’s utility shutoff moratorium:

  • Continues effective immediately and lasts 60 days;
  • Prohibits utility disconnections for all customers;
  • Prohibits billing or collection of late fees, penalties, and other charges for failure to pay; and
  • Extends repayment plans at least six months, and sets the default term for repayment to six months for cases when the utility and customer cannot agree on the terms of an extended repayment plan.

The Order’s evictions moratorium:

  • Is effective immediately and lasts for 3 weeks;
  • Would prevent landlords from initiating summary ejections or other eviction proceedings against a tenant for nonpayment or late payment of rent;
  • Prevents landlords from assessing late fees or other penalties for late or nonpayment;
  • Prevents the accumulation of additional interest, fees, or other penalties for existing late fees while this Order is in effect;
  • Requires landlords to give tenants a minimum of six months to pay outstanding rent;
  • Requires leases to be modified to disallow evicting tenants for reasons of late or nonpayments; and
  • Makes clear that evictions for reasons related to health and safety can take place.

As May draws to a close, North Carolina has recorded 27,673 positive cases of COVID-19 with 1,185 new cases reported Saturday.

One Comment


  1. Bernard Koesters

    May 31, 2020 at 1:49 pm

    What about renters that have just not paid rents even though they have been working all the while? My tenant
    is just that type of person. She has refused to pay anything for the last two months. I call this stealing what do you think?

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