NC Budget and Tax Center

Income tax cut costs will rise to more than $1 billion by 2016, raising serious concerns about whether the current budget negotiations are putting forward a fiscally responsible path to meet the priorities of our state. Before the budget is finalized, legislative leadership must consider this newly available information that the tax cuts will cost more than originally estimated and move immediately to stop further revenue losses in 2015.

Fiscal Research Division revised estimates this week based on new data just released from the Internal Revenue Service on the incomes and taxes paid by North Carolinians through the personal income tax in 2012.

The higher cost of the tax plan is likely the result of the greater benefit that the tax plan has for high wealth taxpayers who have seen their incomes recover more quickly out of the Great Recession. Prior estimates by Fiscal Research Division were based on IRS data from earlier years thus not accounting for this income growth and the latest available information on the costs of deductions and credits.  It is clear not only that the rate reductions are having a larger than anticipated effect but also that we should not expect that base-broadening impacts will be sufficient to hold those revenue losses in check.

The fundamental issue is that the income tax cuts cost more than originally projected and require policymakers to take immediate steps towards stopping further revenue losses with rate reductions automatically scheduled to go into effect in 2015.

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With the release last month of the latest labor market figures, the Budget & Tax Center has updated as well its estimate of the number of missing workers in North Carolina’s labor market.  This measure estimates the number of workers who would be in the labor market, looking for work, if job opportunities were stronger.  In June 2014, the number of missing workers remained elevated at 241,445.  If these workers were counted in the unemployment rate, that rate would be 11.5 percent rather than the official 6.4 percent for that month.

BTC - Missing Workers June 2014

In combination with the state’s persistent jobs deficit, the missing worker measure points to a still weak labor market with too few jobs for those who want to work.

NC Budget and Tax Center

Beginning today, jobless workers in North Carolina can access fewer weeks of unemployment insurance despite a continued lack of jobs and the persistence of long-term unemployment. This is the direct result of a provision in HB4, the unemployment insurance overhaul bill that went into effect last July 1st.

The provision establishes a sliding scale for the maximum number of weeks that is tied to the unemployment rate. The lower the rate, the fewer weeks of unemployment insurance anyone can get. Such an approach to establishing the number of weeks available is only done by 2 other states—Florida and Georgia.

Jobless workers in North Carolina will only be able to access 14 weeks maximum of unemployment insurance beginning today, the lowest duration of weeks in the country. In the last year, the average weeks of duration was 17. And available data point to the continued persistence of long-term unemployment and the disturbing trend of missing workers, workers who would otherwise be in the labor market if job opportunities were stronger. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

The new House budget is a shell game not a financial plan.

It moves money around without addressing North Carolina’s growing needs and promoting broad prosperity.

It shows once again that the tax plan adopted last year lowers our state’s horizons, making it impossible to meet priorities of all North Carolinians like quality education, healthy communities and a growing economy.

The proposal continues to rely on lottery dollars – putting too big a burden on those least able to afford it, and betting on what has proven to be an unreliable source of money over time.

It is essential that state lawmakers pass a budget that both meets our state’s growing needs today and lays a financial foundation to do so tomorrow.

To catch up — and keep up — with the needs of families, halting the income tax cuts scheduled for January 2015 would be a great start.

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Friday the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the NC Division of Employment Security released data on the state of North Carolina’s labor market. The unemployment rate ticked up to 6.4 percent over the month but is still below where it was a year ago.  Despite this annual improvement in the unemployment rate, the reality is the labor market continues to provide too few job opportunities for those who seek work.

The number of missing workers, which estimates who would be in the labor market if job opportunities were stronger, provides additional insight into the state of North Carolina’s labor market.  As of May 2014, there are an estimated 230,517 missing workers in North Carolina.  Again, these are North Carolinians who would be seeking work if jobs were available. If these workers were included in the official unemployment rate that rate would be nearly twice the official unemployment rate: 11.3 percent rather than 6.4 percent.

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