NC Budget and Tax Center

The tax plan signed into law by Gov. McCrory earlier this year has been lauded by proponents as a major accomplishment during the 2013 legislative session. The tax plan, which cuts the state’s corporate and personal income tax rates, makes changes to the sales tax, and includes other tax law changes, reduces revenue for public schools and other public investments by more than $500 million over the next two years. By 2018, the tax plan reduces annual revenue by more than $650 million.

By chalking the tax plan up as a win for all North Carolinians, proponents fail to acknowledge the reality of fewer dollars for public investments and that the plan produces winners and losers. The tax plan does not represent a path toward shared prosperity for all North Carolinians, as BTC’s highlights in its analysis of the tax plan. Under the tax plan, taxpayers earning less than $84,000 a year, on average, will see their taxes increase and more than 65 percent of the net tax cut will flow to the top 1 percent of income earners in the state. 

Here are examples of taxpayers in North Carolina who are likely to see their total tax bill go up as a result of this plan. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

Businesses in North Carolina have been instructed by the state Department of Revenue to have their employees complete a new NC-4 tax form and workers and employers may be unclear as to why this is required. The simple answer is that the tax plan signed into law by Gov. McCrory means taxpayers will be paying more or less in NC personal income taxes starting next year.

Employers in the state are required by law to withhold a portion of their employees’ wages, typically each pay period, for NC personal income taxes and the NC-4 form helps employers estimate the amount of taxes to withhold. The new NC-4 form attempts to ensure that no employee is stuck at the end of the year owing a lot in NC personal income taxes or is owed a large refund by the state as a result of employers continuing to withhold NC personal income taxes based on 2013 tax laws. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

A majority of North Carolinians oppose tax cuts that put at risk the state’s investment in public education, a recent Public Policy Polling (PPP) survey shows. When presented with cutting funding for public schools in order to provide taxpayers a tax cut, 68% of North Carolinians oppose such a move.

The tax plan signed by Governor McCrory earlier this year reduced available revenue by $525 million over the next two years and revenue in future years is reduced even further. Benefits from tax cuts in the tax plan will largely flow to the wealthy and profitable corporations, which represent less than 10 percent of all businesses in North Carolina. Under the tax plan, the wealthiest taxpayers will see their taxes cut on average by more than $9,000, with top 1 percent of income earners getting 65 percent of the total net tax cut.

Opposition to cutting investments in public education to provide such tax cuts extends across ideology and political affiliation. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center, Poverty and Policy Matters

At a time when ensuring that all students receive a quality education is more important than ever, students from low-income families are increasingly less likely to experience academic success and educational opportunities than their affluent peers. In fact, students from affluent families are 10 times more likely to graduate from high school and go on to earn a college degree by age 24 compared to students from low-income families.

This skewed outcome alone is startling, but what it projects for North Carolina’s future is even more troubling. With an increasing number of jobs in the state, and nationally, expected to require some level of postsecondary education, we need more of our students from low-income families – who now represent a majority of students in our public schools – graduating from high school and going on to earn a postsecondary credential.

The United States is one of the few advanced nations where more educational resources tend to flow to schools serving better-off children than schools serving poor students, a recent New York Times article highlights. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

Nearly half of likely North Carolina voters familiar with the tax cut package state lawmakers enacted this year oppose it, while only 42 percent support it. Don’t take our word for it. That’s what a poll by a prominent supporter of the package shows.

Of course, the group that commissioned the poll, Americans for Prosperity, chose to highlight other results that were more favorable to its position. But those results came only after the respondents were given one-sided information about the tax package, which slashed income taxes for profitable corporations and the wealthy.

Among those who had heard “a lot” or “some” information about the tax package even before the pollster called, 47% opposed it. Forty-two percent supported it and 11% weren’t sure. Read More