Yesterday the General Counsel of the National Labor Relations Board said that McDonald’s Corporation could be held liable as a joint employer for labor violations at its franchise operations.  The Labor Board is considering complaints brought by McDonald’s employees who claim they were retaliated against by their employers after participating in protests back in November 2012, but the significance of this ruling goes far beyond the complaints pending before the Labor Board.

This decision is a huge victory for the fast food workers organizing to demand $15 and a union.  Corporations like McDonald’s have refused to negotiate with fast food workers, such as the members of NC Raise Up who have been organizing in North Carolina for the past year, claiming that they don’t set wages and don’t have power over how much the franchisees pay.  But yesterday’s ruling is based on the General Counsel’s conclusion that McDonald’s does, in fact, have substantial control over what happens in the individual stores.  McDonald’s won’t be able to hide behind that argument anymore.

This ruling may also signal how judges will rule in several wage theft lawsuits filed in March of this year which allege that McDonald’s is a joint employer and jointly liable with the local franchisees for violations of wage and hour laws.   Those lawsuits allege that through the  franchise agreements and monitoring of the local stores, McDonald’s has enough control over day to day operations to be considered an employer.

 

There is something inspiring happening in North Carolina right now.

It started back in August when fast food workers across North Carolina participated in a national strike by walking off their jobs to demand a living wage.   Since then, hundreds of North Carolinian workers have spoken up about the need for living wages and the right to organize.  These workers are speaking out and sharing their stories about the daily struggles of surviving on low pay that make it hard to pay rent or buy clothing for their children. 

This week, there is an opportunity to learn more about the campaign and hear from some of the workers who are demanding better treatment. 

Come to a Nov. 6 public forum with the Carolina Organizing Committee at the North Carolina Justice Center. The event starts at 6:30 p.m. and is open to the public.  

You can also learn more about the campaign, and the lives of fast food workers, by watching this video:

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Wednesday’s forum will delve into two reports released in October by the National Employment Law Project and University of California Berkeley Read More

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How old were you when you got your first paying job? For most of you the answer will be 16 or later. In 1938 the Fair Labor Standards Act was amended to establish for the first time a minimum age for lawful employment in the United States.  That age was- and still is- 16. In those industries identified as particularly hazardous, such as mining, the minimum age is 18. But in agriculture, which ranks among the most hazardous industries, kids as young as 10 can be lawfully employed.  As an article in this week’s Independent Weekly explains, children working on North Carolina farms face all kinds of risks, including heat stress and pesticide exposure.

Last fall the United States Department of Labor (USDOL) proposed new rules  to protect children from dangerous work in agriculture.  This is the first update to the rules in 40 years. The proposed changes were based largely on recommendations made by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Those rules would create 15 new Agricultural Hazardous Occupation Orders, or “Ag. H.O.s.”  Children under age 16 would not be allowed to work in the occupations designated as an “Ag. H.O.” unless it is on a farm owned and operated by their parents.  If adopted, the rules would, among other things: Read More

Based on new DOL regulations, the wages that employers using the H-2B visa program are required to pay will increase by, on average, about $4 per hour.  Not surprisingly, many of those employers are claiming that this increase will put them out of business, but this long overdue adjustment of H-2B wages is necessary to ensure that U.S. workers are no longer adversely impacted by allowing employers to import foreign workers. Read More