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New rules would protect farmworker children from hazardous activities

How old were you when you got your first paying job? For most of you the answer will be 16 or later. In 1938 the Fair Labor Standards Act was amended to establish for the first time a minimum age for lawful employment in the United States.  That age was- and still is- 16. In those industries identified as particularly hazardous, such as mining, the minimum age is 18. But in agriculture, which ranks among the most hazardous industries, kids as young as 10 can be lawfully employed.  As an article in this week’s Independent Weekly explains, children working on North Carolina farms face all kinds of risks, including heat stress and pesticide exposure.

Last fall the United States Department of Labor (USDOL) proposed new rules  to protect children from dangerous work in agriculture.  This is the first update to the rules in 40 years. The proposed changes were based largely on recommendations made by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Those rules would create 15 new Agricultural Hazardous Occupation Orders, or “Ag. H.O.s.”  Children under age 16 would not be allowed to work in the occupations designated as an “Ag. H.O.” unless it is on a farm owned and operated by their parents.  If adopted, the rules would, among other things: Read more

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New foreign worker wage increase long overdue

Based on new DOL regulations, the wages that employers using the H-2B visa program are required to pay will increase by, on average, about $4 per hour.  Not surprisingly, many of those employers are claiming that this increase will put them out of business, but this long overdue adjustment of H-2B wages is necessary to ensure that U.S. workers are no longer adversely impacted by allowing employers to import foreign workers. Read more