NC Budget and Tax Center

How can North Carolina make sure students are eating breakfast?

The benefits of school breakfast participation are clear — reduced hunger, improved academic achievement and test scores, elevated health and nutrition, and reduced absenteeism, tardiness, and behavior referrals. In 2016-2017, more children participated in the school breakfast program nationally than ever before, according to the Food Research Action Center’s (FRAC) School Breakfast Scorecard. This report measures the reach of the School Breakfast Program in the 2016–2017 school year — nationally and in each state — based on a variety of metrics, and examines the impact of select trends and policies on program participation. While participation from year to year has continued to increase nationally, the rate of growth has slowed.

We want to ensure a thriving North Carolina by providing everyone with the resources to have a sufficient childhood development. North Carolina is the 10th hungriest state in the nation, meaning many families face high levels of food insecurity. These families do not have access to the nutritious foods necessary to safeguard their children are healthy. For children, poor nutrition is associated with anxiety, diet-related diseases, learning difficulties, and health problems, that can affect them throughout their K-12 education journey and as they continue to grow into adulthood. The school breakfast program plays a critical role in filling voids for low-income families. Here are some ways NC schools can continue to increase breakfast participation: Read more

NC Budget and Tax Center

Making sure students aren’t hungry should be a top priority for N.C.

The healthy development of children is essential to building and sustaining a prosperous society.  Still, 1 in 5 North Carolina children face food insecurity each day, which threatens their well-being and life outcomes.  Nationally, North Carolina is the 8th most food insecure state in the country, with 1 out of every 6 households being food insecure – meaning these families do not access to food, which is needed to ensure their child is healthy, academically successful, and has sufficient early childhood development.

Food insecure households with children are more likely to have trouble with providing adequate food for the family. For children, poor nutrition is associated with anxiety, diet-related diseases, learning difficulties, health problems, and other poor health outcomes that can affect them throughout their K-12 education journey and as they grow into adulthood.

Addressing North Carolina’s persistent food insecurity challenge requires deliberate attention to the role, design and impact of federal, state and local initiatives that aim to ensure access to food for everyone in communities across the state. The positive link between the health of students and their academic achievement is an opportunity we much seize upon and leverage as a state. Children who eat breakfast perform better on standardized tests and have better concentration in class, increased alertness, improved comprehension, improved memory, and improved learning.

Here are some of the ways in which public policy and initiatives can work to combat child hunger and assist educators with improving the learning outcomes of students. Read more