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Just as the state tax debate comes to a close for this year, the tax reform debate at the federal level is heating up.  And once again, the choices are stark.  Americans for Tax Fairness put together the following example of the trade-off between tax cuts for some of the wealthiest individuals in the US and funding for elementary, secondary, and special education. While members of Wall Street are seeing more money in their already hefty pockets, children across the country are experiencing a loss of instructors, transportation, and more as a result of budget cuts driven by an inadequate and unfair tax system…

Read more at: http://www.americansfortaxfairness.org/blog/2013/08/06/tuesday-tax-trade-off-better-education-for-our-kids-vs-tax-breaks-for-wall-street-fund-managers/

The hope-filled message behind the American Dream is becoming a nightmare for many families in North Carolina. Due to the widespread income inequality in the state, economic mobility (the ability of people to improve their economic standing) is becoming more difficult for North Carolinians. This translates as well to intergenerational economic mobility, or the ability of children to achieve higher economic status than their parents. While factors such as education attainment, geography and socioeconomic status impact the ability of individuals to get ahead, a recent study by the National Bureau of Economic Research finds that more progressive tax expenditures are positively correlated with higher intergenerational mobility.

Specifically the progressivity of mortgage interest deductions and Earned Income Tax Credits (EITC) each have positive correlations with the ability of children to be more successful than their parents. In addition, the progressivity of state income taxes is also found to be significantly related to higher intergenerational mobility, thus paving the way to true achievement of the American Dream. Read More

North Carolina has dropped one place since last year to rank 35th in the nation according to an annual KIDS COUNT data report about the overall well-being of children in the United States. This data report determines and ranks states on the basis of performance in sixteen level indicators across four domains; economic well-being, family and community, health, and education.

North Carolina’s drop to the 35th spot largely results from the state’s lackluster performance in improving its economic well-being. Currently, North Carolina is ranked 38th in the nation for economic well-being, three spots below last year’s ranking. This data report breaks down economic well-being into four categories, each of which North Carolina failed to show any progress. The KIDS COUNT State Profile for North Carolina reports that twenty-six percent of children are impoverished and thirty-four percent of parents lack secure employment in this state alone. Accordingly, in North Carolina, the amount of children living in households with high housing burden costs has seen a four percent increase since 2005, and ten percent of teens are currently not working or in school.

In comparison to last year’s report, Read More