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Fayetteville State University has new interim chancellor

Dr. Peggy Valentine will be the new interim chancellor of Fayetteville State University.

Dr. Peggy Valentine will serve as the interim chancellor at Fayetteville State University.

UNC System Interim President Bill Roper announced the appointment, effective, August 7, in a prepared statement Friday.

“I am proud to announce the appointment of Dr. Valentine, someone in whom I am confident in and who has demonstrated great leadership capabilities during her tenure as a dean at Winston-Salem State,” Roper said in the prepared statement.

“While at WSSU, she has transformed the School of Health Sciences into a widely-respected and popular program, leading its continued growth and success,” Roper said. “I know she will bring her remarkable attributes and skills to this new interim role at Fayetteville State. I wish to thank her for agreeing to take on this new challenge.”

Valentine currently serves as dean of the School of Health Sciences at Winston-Salem State University, where she oversees programs in clinical laboratory science, exercise physiology, health care management, nursing, rehabilitation counseling and physical and occupational therapy. She has a doctorate in education from Virginia Tech University and a master of arts and a bachelor of science degrees from Howard University.

Valentine’s area of research specialization is homeless and minority health issues. She is the founding editor-in-chief for the Journal of Best Practices in Health Professions Diversity.

Her interest in increasing diversity in the health professions has led to her overseeing the development of early assurance agreements that guarantee admission into high-demand graduate programs for WSSU undergraduates who meet certain requirements. The school expanded its work toward eliminating health disparities among the residents of Winston-Salem under her leadership.

“I am honored to be asked to serve in this role at Fayetteville State University,” Dr. Valentine said in a prepared statement. “I look forward to working with the Board of Trustees, administration, and faculty to move FSU forward during this time of transition. FSU has a proud tradition of excellence and is one of the most diverse universities in the country. With nationally-ranked academic programs, growing research capacity, and strong military partnerships, FSU is a major economic engine for the entire Fayetteville and Cumberland County region.”

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New interim chancellor appointed at UNC School of the Arts

Brian Cole will serve as interim chancellor of the UNC School of the Arts, the UNC system announced Wednesday.

UNC System Interim President Bill Roper announced Cole’s appointment, which will be effective August 1.

Brian Cole will serve as interim chancellor of the UNC School of the Arts.

“Brian Cole’s impressive international background in the arts and his leadership experience made him the ideal candidate to step in and lead UNCSA,” Roper said in a prepared statement Wednesday. “Throughout this selection process, I found Brian’s reputation and professionalism to be of the highest caliber, and many stakeholders at UNCSA have reached out to offer enthusiastic support for this appointment. Brian is an innovator, collaborator and deep thinker, and I have the utmost confidence that he will succeed in this new interim position.”

Cole, who has served as UNCSA’s Dean of the School fo Music since 2016, will replace Chancellor Lindsay Bierman. Last month Roper announced Bierman will leave his position to become the new chief executive officer of UNC-TV Public Media North Carolina.

Cole is a doctoral candidate in Orchestral Conducting at the University of Cincinnati. He received his Master of Music in Instrumental Conducting from the University of Illinois and his Bachelor of Music in Bassoon Performance from Louisiana State University. He has led orchestras and operas throughout the United States, Europe, South America and in the Caribbean. He served seven years as associate dean of Academic Affairs at the Puerto Rico Conservatory of Music and four years as the founding dean of Academic Affairs at Berklee College of Music’s campus in Valencia, Spain.

“I’m honored to be stepping into the role of interim chancellor at UNCSA, an institution I so strongly believe in,” Cole said in a prepared statement Wednesday. “In my position as dean of the School of Music since 2016, I have been continuously inspired by the level of talent and dedication of the students, alumni, faculty and staff throughout this unique institution, and by the collaborative and creative ethos that permeates the school.”

News

Study: Reported hate crimes up 64 percent in NC

A new Safe Home study based on FBI hate crime data shows reported hate crimes in North Carolina rose 64 percent from 2013-2017.

That’s significantly more than the national rise of 22 percent.

According to the data, racism accounted for 6 percent of all single-bias offenses, religion for 21 percent and sexual orientation 16 percent.

Black people were the most targeted racial group at 50 percent of all race related crimes.

Of religion related crimes, Jewish people were the most targeted at 58 percent.  Muslims were the next highest category with 19 percent.

 


Read the full study — and information about methodology — here.

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N.C. gets $1.2 million in grants as it grapples with policies to combat opioid crisis

Rural areas in North Carolina will share $1.2 million in federal grant dollars to expand their response to the opioid epidemic, the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services announced this week.

Six separate hospitals or organizations will receive a $200,000grant:  Ashe Memorial Hospital in Jefferson, Coastal Horizons Center in Wilmington, North Carolina Quality Healthcare Alliance in Chapel Hill, Robeson Health Care Corporation in Pembroke, United Way of Rutherford County in Forest City, and Wilson Substance Abuse Coalition in Wilson.

“Many North Carolinians living in rural communities struggle to access opioid use disorder treatment due to a lack of providers and insurance funding for treatment,” said Kody H. Kinsley, N.C. Department of Health and Human Services’ Deputy Secretary for Behavioral Health & Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, in a written statement.

“This award will support our efforts to address these challenges and help individuals obtain treatment and move into recovery,” Kinsley said.

Six rural North Carolina communities will share $1.2 million in federal grant funds to strengthen and expand their response to opioid use disorder with increased planning; prevention; evidence-based treatment, including medication-assisted treatment; and recovery service delivery.

The federal money will go toward evidence-based treatment, the department said — including prevention, medication-assisted treatment and recovery service delivery.

The grants come as North Carolina government continues to struggle with the direction of its policies to address the opioid crisis.

On Tuesday activists staged a “die in” demonstration outside of the North Carolina Governor’s mansion to urge Gov. Roy Cooper to veto House Bill 474, the “Death by Distribution” bill.

The bill, which has been passed by the legislature and is awaiting the governor’s signature or veto, expands prosecution for second degree murder when someone dies of an overdose. Critics say such laws disproportionately impact communities of color and further criminalizes those struggling with addiction, making them hesitant to call the police or 911 for help.

“The outcome of laws like HB474 is two lives lost instead of one — and a false appearance of retribution, justice and revenge,” said Louise Vincent, director of the North Carolina Survivors Union. “It will not reduce the number of overdoses and it will surely further the racial injustices of the drug war. At a time when communities across the country are trying to reduce the prison population, North Carolina shouldn’t be enacting a bill that would put more people who use drugs behind bars.”

 

News

Status of Women in North Carolina: Health and Wellness report launches next week

The Council for Women and Youth Involvement is releasing its 2019 Status of Women in North Carolina: Health and Wellness report next week.

The report, the second of four to be released by the council in partnership with the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, will be officially launched at events in Asheville on June 25th and in Wilmington on June 26th.

A preview of the report  throws light on some troubling health data and makes policy recommendations for improving conditions.

According to the report, among U.S. women, NC has:

  • The 9th highest stroke mortality rate
  • The 11th highest infant mortality rate
  • The 13th highest diabetes mortality rate

The state is also in the top ten for sexually transmitted infection diagnoses, including:

  • The 7th highest AIDS diagnoses rate
  • The 8th highest Chlamydia case rate
  • The 9th highest Gonorrhea case rate

The preview also contains racial breakdowns of mortality rates for heart disease, stroke and breast cancer. Black woman in the state having the highest rates of each.

The first launch event will be held at the Mountain Area Health Education Center, 121 Hendersonville Road in Asheville on Tuesday, June 25 at 10 a.m.

The second will be held at UNC-Wilmington’s McNeill Hall Lecture Hall, 601 South College Road on Wednesday, June 26th at 10 a.m.