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If you sell tin-foil hats, you may want to pay a visit to the Wake County Board of Commissioners– I think they may be in need of your services.  I have to admit that I don’t spend a tremendous amount of time monitoring the goings on of the Wake Commissioners since we do work all over the state, but Wake is my home, so I do try to pay them some attention. I am sorry I did.

The big headline yesterday was supposed to be the Commission’s vote on a resolution in favor of the discriminatory constitutional amendment on the ballot in May. They ultimately did vote in favor of the resolution, to the surprise of no one. But to my mind, the real story out of the meeting was the absolutely bizarre behavior by the conservatives on the commission regarding the findings of a sustainability plan commissioned for the County. If you thought you were watching the Wake Committee on Un-American Activities, you could be forgiven. Read More

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Saying Newt Gingrich is the best debater in the GOP primary race is like saying an elephant does a better cannonball than a mouse – sure, it’s true, but that really isn’t the point.  The same can be said about what Newt keeps saying about President Obama: sure, more people are using food stamps than when he took office, but is that really the point?

No, it isnt’t, but it sure does get headlines. Newt’s newest attack glibly claims:

“The fact is that more people have been put on food stamps by Barack Obama than any president in American history … I believe every American of every background has been endowed by their creator with the right to pursue happiness. And if that makes liberals unhappy, I’m going to continue to find ways to help poor people learn how to get a job, learn how to get a better job and learn some day to own the job.”

Aside from the fact that the president didn’t “put” anyone on food stamps, this might not be the winning argument Newt thinks it is. According to a new poll , Read More

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(Cross-posted from the Action NC blog)

Conservatives are obsessed with cutting spending this year, no matter the collateral damage. Think early childhood education is important? Too bad – cut. Maybe higher-ed? Nope – cut. Healthcare for poor children? Cut. Services for seniors? Tough luck – cut.

At a certain point, you have to wonder what in the world these legislators think they are doing. Forget the moral arguments for a moment (we’ve made them), and let’s concentrate on something we know they’re focused on: self interest.

Take Speaker of the House Thom Tillis, who just reiterated his objections to fully funding the early childhood education program that the Superior Court has ordered him to support. Looking at statistical models, we can project what the rest of his life, as well as millions like him, will look like. Tillis is 52 years old, which means–at least statistically—that he has another 29 years to go. We can also project that his health will begin to decline around age 60 and continue to do so, with a probable trip to a nursing home, before he dies somewhere around 2040. Read More

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Closed Doors(Cross-posted from the Action NC blog)

To those following both the ongoing negotiations of the Congressional “Supercommittee” in Washington and the incredibly protracted session of the NC General Assembly, there is one tie that binds: secrecy.

No one, outside of the select few in power, have any idea what the heck is going on.

For example, the deficit reduction negations that have apparently been progressing for months in order to trim our national debt by over a trillion dollars haven’t been generating much press. Unless you’ve been looking really hard, you probably haven’t seen or heard much about their progress (or lack thereof) because all of negotiations have been done behind closed doors. This weekend, Congressional leaders met with members of the deadlocked committee in order to facilitate an ending, but guess how they did it? Behind closed doors.

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Seats.jpg(Cross-posted from the Action NC blog)

I have decided that it’s time to replace my car. It’s a clunker, to say the least. With more than a decade on the road and well over the 100,000 miles on the odometer, the old girl is just starting to fail.  My car has become so unreliable, in fact, that I thought it might be a good idea to figure out how I would get to work if one morning my car just decided not to start.

Every wonder how you would get to work if you didn’t have a car? The short answer is Read More