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Loretta LynchThe U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee will commence the vetting process for Attorney General nominee Loretta Lynch this morning. This ought to be a proud moment for North Carolinians as Lynch would be the first native of our state to serve in the position. She grew up here and her immediate family still lives in the state.

Unfortunately, at this point, we don’t even know what action North Carolina’s two senators (including Senator Tillis, who serves on the Judiciary Committee) will take on the nomination. Let’s hope they do the right thing. Contact information for Tillis is available here.

Here is some additional information about Lynch and her ties to North Carolina compiled by the good folks at the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. The more you read, the more impressed you will be:

Attorney General Nominee Loretta Lynch Has Extensive Ties to North Carolina

  • Loretta Lynch, the nominee for Attorney General of the United States, is a North Carolina native whose immediate family still lives in the State. Lynch’s experiences growing up in North Carolina during the civil rights movement helped shaped her strong sense of fairness and justice on which she has relied throughout her extraordinary legal career. North Carolinians are extremely proud of her nomination and are eager to see her quickly confirmed by the U.S. Senate.
  • On November 8, President Obama nominated Loretta Lynch to be the 83nd Attorney General of the United States. President Obama described Lynch as “tough, fair and independent.” The Attorney General is considered the nation’s top law enforcement official.
  • Lynch would be the first African American woman to hold the position. Only one other African American, Eric H. Holder, Jr., and one other woman, Janet Reno, have held the office.
  • Importantly for North Carolina, Loretta Lynch would be the first North Carolina native ever to serve as Attorney General in the history of this country. Read More
Commentary

Looks like those leftist tree huggers at the EPA are at it again. This is from AP:

“The Obama administration floated a plan Tuesday that for the first time would open up a broad swath of the Atlantic Coast to drilling, even as it moved to restrict drilling in environmentally-sensitive areas off Alaska.

The proposal envisions auctioning areas located more than 50 miles off Virginia, North and South Carolina, and Georgia to oil companies come 2021, long after President Barack Obama leaves office. For decades, oil companies have been barred from drilling in the Atlantic Ocean, where a moratorium was in place up until 2008.”

Meanwhile, the good folks at Environment NC have released this excellent statement in response to the Obama administration’s momentary departure from rationality:

“New plan puts North Carolina in the cross-hairs for offshore oil drilling and exploration

Raleigh, NC- Today, Secretary Sally Jewel and the Bureau of Ocean and Energy Management (BOEM) released the five-year draft plan for offshore oil drilling, and North Carolina is front and center.

‘From Kitty Hawk to Cape Hatteras, the Outer Banks are one of North Carolina’s shining gems,’ said Dave Rogers, Environment North Carolina state director. ‘We’re putting our natural heritage at risk if we allow offshore drilling off our coasts.’

Read More

Commentary

TeachersRaleigh’s News & Observer features a rather strange op-ed this morning by a Duke University Master’s student who once gave teaching a try and who is also the husband of a current, relatively young public school teacher. In it, the author praises last year’s convoluted state teacher pay plan as “brilliant” because it targets young teachers like his wife for big raises.

According to the author, raising pay for young teachers “stopped the bleeding” of teacher exoduses and makes sense because young teachers are full of great new ideas and most older teachers ain’t going anywhere anyway. He goes on to “praise” the pay plan as an amoral business move that has “quelled public unrest.”

“No one is wearing red anymore, Moral Mondays are just Mondays now, public support is waning and the Republicans won the elections. The battle is over, teachers lost and no one is listening anymore.”

To which, all a body can say in response is: Wow – it’s good to know that someone with such opinions and values isn’t in the public schools anymore. Read More

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Mandy Locke

Mandy Locke

Looking to learn about an issue — any issue — on which the North Carolina General Assembly might actually pursue a moderately progressive course in 2015? If so, you should definitely plan on attending this Wednesday’s Crucial Conversation luncheon with Raleigh News & Observer reporter Mandy Locke: “Fraud in the workplace: How numerous North Carolina employers are cheating their competitors and stealing from employees and taxpayers (and what should be done about it).”

Locke will discuss the ongoing multimillion dollar crime spree in North Carolina in which “wage theft” and “worker misclassification” by dishonest employers are both robbing workers (and state tax coffers) of millions and millions of dollars. Please join us as we explore this huge and poorly understood problem and how state lawmakers and regulators might properly address it.

Locke will be joined by Raleigh businessman Doug Burton, President and Owner of Whitman Masonry and one of the numerous North Carolina employers who treats his workers fairly, plays by the rules and is regularly disadvantaged as a result of the state’s lax law enforcement in this area and Bill Rowe, General Counsel and Director of Advocacy at the North Carolina Justice Center, who will discuss possible legislative and law enforcement solutions.

When: Wednesday, January 28th, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. (At the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s streets)

Space is limited – preregistration required.

Cost: $10, admission includes a box lunch.

Click here to register

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com

Commentary

Tom Ross_1162015If you haven’t done so already, check out Charlotte Observer contributor Alice Carmichael Richey’s essay decrying the UNC Board of Governor’s inexplicable firing of system president, Tom Ross (pictured at left).

As Richey argues persuasively, the Board’s actions simply ought not to be allowed to stand in their present form — i.e. unexplained.

“The board acknowledged its decision had nothing to do with Ross’s ‘performance or ability to continue in the office’ and was made despite the board’s belief that he ‘has been a wonderful president’ with a ‘fantastic work ethic’ and ‘perfect integrity’ who ‘worked well with [the] Board.’”

After quoting the board chair, she goes on:

“All of this begs at least two questions: Why did the board make this decision and, no less important in light of public reaction, will the board reconsider? Read More