Author

Commentary

NC Policy Watch contributor Betsey Russell recently forwarded a story from the Akron Beacon Journal that raises further doubts about for-profit charter schools. It turns out that the Beacon-Journal has been conducting a months-long study of charters in Ohio and discovered that for-profit charters were consistently among the worst performers. As the article notes:

“Ohio’s charter schools have a national reputation for hiring for-profit companies that produce poor academic results.

Only three of 26 states had lower performing charter schools, according to a Stanford University study of states with schools in operation long enough to compare results.

After a year in a charter school, Ohio students typically lag behind district school students by weeks in reading and months in math, the study finds.

In most states, it’s the opposite.

A factor in the difference appears to be the motivation to make money.

Tennessee, New York and Rhode Island, which the study reckons have the highest-performing charter school sectors, are among the six states that ban for-profit companies.”

The story goes on: Read More

Commentary

Today’s editorial in the Wilmington Star News speaks the truth about the controversy manufactured by some on the Right about the AP history course taught in our high schools. Here’s the excellent conclusion:

“Students learn from the time they are in grade school that America is special, that it is a force for good in the world, that its people cherish the “inalienable rights” with which their creator endowed them. But history is not an exercise in black and white. It involves many shades of gray, and complex, often conflicted human beings. The struggles that our nation went through over its 238 years are an important part of that story, and the story of how the nation grappled with and addressed those problems collectively represent the pluck and “American exceptionalism” the state law emphasizes.

AP History is not taught in a vacuum. Most students who take the course should be familiar with the basics; some concepts are covered or reinforced in other courses, such as civics and world history. Most advanced-placement teachers are among the best in their school; their students are among the best and brightest. At this level students should be considering a variety of perspectives on a single event and shaping their own conclusions based on the facts and opinions presented.

If the state board believes the course doesn’t spend enough time on the founding principles, it could mandate American History I as a prerequisite, although that would require eating into other electives that also enrich students’ education and could be redundant. But neither the board nor the General Assembly should seek to dilute a college-level course that is designed to promote critical thinking, a skill important not only in job seeking but in being an informed United States citizen and well-rounded adult.

Before meddling with a well-respected history course, perhaps legislators should go back to school and sit in on a few AP History lessons. It could be a good refresher.

Amen. Read the entire editorial by clicking here.

 

News

Raise upFast food workers and their allies will be gathering in several locations tomorrow to demand higher wage and union rights.

This is from the good people at Raise Up for 15:

Fast Food workers across North Carolina are joining a nationwide strike with fast food workers all over the country. Let’s build the Fight for $15 Movement in the South! We believe that we will win!

Join us Thursday, Dec 4th in a city near you:

6:00 AM Charlotte: 4435 The Plaza
6:00 AM Durham 3558 Hillsborough Rd
6:00 AM Greensboro 2003 High Point Rd
6:00 AM Greenville 3602 Charles Blvd

*11:30 AM: Greensboro Striking workers from across NC will converge at the Four Seasons Station Parking Lot (2700 Vanstory St)

For more information, visit the Raise Up for 15 webpage by clicking here.

Commentary

Payday loansThe Charlotte Observer hits a home run this morning with this editorial entitled “An industry that hasn’t been missed.” As the authors make clear, North Carolina elected leaders should continue to use all tools at their disposal to resist the efforts of “payday loan” sharks to reintroduce their predatory (and long banned) 400% loans into our state. The conclusion of the editorial sums things up nicely:

“Congress recognized the predatory nature of the industry and in strong bipartisan fashion in 2007 capped interest rates at 36 percent APR on loans made to active military members and their families. It was right for our armed forces, and it’s right for everyone else.

It’s not a partisan issue. Many Republicans and Democrats alike oppose the practice, and some in each party support it. Whether you’re morally offended by a 400 percent interest rate or just see the damage it does to those who can least afford it, there’s a lot not to like.

Congress should ban the practice nationwide. Until that happens, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau should install rules banning some of the most nefarious practices. And North Carolina legislators should stand firm and tell payday lenders: We don’t want your money.”

Click here to read the entire editorial.

And click here to get the full skinny on this morally bankrupt industry.

Commentary
John Skvarla

John Skvarla

Sharon Decker

Sharon Decker

North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory announced a major change in his cabinet today. Commerce Secretary Sharon Decker is out and Secretary of Environment and Natural Resources John Skvarla will take her place. No word yet on who will head DENR after Skvarla.

Though it’s hardly unprecedented for a Governor to, in effect, transfer secretaries from one agency to another, in a normal/sane world this particular switch would raise eyebrows. After all, it’s one thing to be the state’s top environmental protection chief and it’s quite another to be it’s top business schmoozer.

Or at least it ought to be.

Unfortunately, under the present regime in Raleigh, such an idea is perfectly logical and consistent. That’s one of the main reasons that today’s announcement produced a unanimous yawn from state political observers: No one ever had any illusion that Skvarla was doing anything other than serving the state’s big business community at DENR. By all appearances, the new gig will simply allow him to do essentially the same thing he’s been doing  — just with a different title.