News

Apodaca wants Charlotte to cover costs of special session that rammed through anti-LGBTQ legislation

The special session Wednesday that passed legislation banning localities from protecting LGBTQ communities came at a cost of $42,000. Not satisfied that they’ve overturned the Charlotte ordinance — which would’ve allowed transgender people to use bathrooms corresponding to their gender identity — now State Sen. Tom Apodaca (R-Henderson) wants the city of Charlotte to foot the bill as well.

Blue Ridge Now reports:

State Sen. Tom Apodaca (R-Henderson) has asked his staff to look and see how the General Assembly can charge Charlotte to cover the costs of Wednesday’s special session, including the possibility of withholding the city’s sales tax revenues.

Lawmakers met Wednesday and passed a law invalidating a measure the Charlotte City Council passed last month to allow transgender people to use restrooms corresponding with their gender identity.

“Charlotte brought this all upon themselves,” knowing exactly what they were getting into, Apodaca said.

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Commentary

Businesses and community leaders speak up for equality and against discrimination #wearenotthis

Business and community leaders offer a powerful response to North Carolina’s new anti-LGBT law.

Here is a sampling: (Check back as we update!)

 

 

 

 

 

News

Asian Americans fastest-growing demographic in North Carolina, report finds

nc-aapi-demographic-report-screenshot

The Institute for Southern Studies, Southeast Asian Coalition (SEAC), Asian Americans Advancing Justice and the N.C. Justice Center jointly released a report today, noting the Asian American population in North Carolina as the fastest-growing racial group in the state.

SEAC is also working with another local civic engagement group, N.C.’s Asian Americans Together, to run a nonpartisan get-out-the-vote event Saturday in Charlotte and Raleigh to encourage Asian Americans to vote in the state primary election next Tuesday. A sign-up form for interested volunteers for the Saturday phone bank can be found here.

Some highlights from the report include:

  • Diversity: Over 20 ethnicities, countries of origin and languages are represented in the state’s Asian-American community.
  • Relatively high citizenship rates: Although nearly 60 percent of Asian-American residents were born abroad, the citizenship rate is about 70 percent. Rates vary by ethnicity and country of origin.
  • Low voter registration rates: About 100,000 Asian Americans are registered to vote, reflecting only 58 percent of eligible Asian-American voters. By comparison, 70 percent of all eligible voters in the state are registered.

more here

Commentary

56 years after Greensboro sit ins, racial justice remains important issue

It’s been 56 years since the sit ins in my hometown of Greensboro energized the civil rights movement in the U.S.

Since then, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 made it possible for de facto segregation to stop in places like lunch counters and other public accommodations, banned employment discrimination, and it began the process for equality in the workplace. (Though much remains to be done.)

Image by Cewatkin. (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Pictured: The A&T Four Statue in Greensboro commemorating the participants of the first sit-ins at a Woolworth store. Image by Cewatkin. (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Meanwhile, Brown v. Board ended de facto segregation in schools, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 opened the electoral process to Black and minority voters.

The list goes on for the progress we’ve made as a country toward a better future.

And yet…

Where are we now?

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