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In a 5-4 opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage in an opinion released today.

Written by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, the court held that marriage is a fundamental right under the 14th amendment.

“No union is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice, and family. … [The challengers] ask for equal dignity in the eyes of the law,” the concluding paragraph of the majority opinion states. “The Constitution grants them that right.”

Here’s the opinion, please share your reactions and thoughts below:

 

14-556_3204.pdf by NC Policy Watch

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Doyle Parrish

Doyle Parrish

A member of the University of North Carolina’s Board of Governors is facing an assault charge related to a May domestic violence incident, the News & Observer is reporting.

Doyle Parrish, who heads the Summit Hospitality Group and was appointed by the state legislature to the university governing board in 2013, was charged with a misdemeanor charge of assault on a female in relation to a May incident reported to Raleigh police.

From the N&O report:

He was arrested last month after a woman said he slapped her and pushed her to the ground in his Raleigh home. Parrish, 61, was charged with one misdemeanor count of assault on a female on May 13, according to court records. The alleged victim, Nancy Parrish, reported the incident to Raleigh police. His wife is named Nancy Parrish.

The woman reported bruising and abrasions on her shin and foot, according to a court document.

Parrish could not be reached.

A magistrate ordered Parrish remain in the Wake County Jail on a mandatory domestic violence hold for two days. A district court judge on May 18 ordered Parrish released on his promise to appear at his next court date and ordered him to stay away from his wife.

The N&O article also mentioned a 2013 email from then-N.C. House Speaker Thom Tillis to Republican lawmakers pointing out Parrish was “directly responsible for more than $100,000 in financial support through personal contributions to my campaign committee and other candidates and through the Hospitality Alliance.”

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Want to know what the University of North Carolina’s Board of Governors is looking for in its next leader?

Here’s the 46-page leadership statement (scroll down to read) adopted Thursday by a board subcommittee that spells out what qualifications, qualities and values are desired for whoever replaces outgoing UNC President Tom Ross.

The statement was developed by taking input from a number of stakeholder groups, from the board itself, as well as faculty, students, alumni, business leaders and the general public.

As would be expected, there was significant variety in what different groups are looking for in the next UNC president.

According to the lengthy leadership statement, students want an energetic leader, who “values diversity and accessibility in the UNC system.”

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The Senate’s budget proposal for the next two years had some significant health policy changes packed into it, namely a proposal to peel Medicaid oversight away from the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services and open the door for managed-care management of the $14 billion program.

House and Senate Republicans have spent the last few years debating what to do with Medicaid and how to address routine budget overruns from the federally-mandated program that provides health care coverage for low-income, seniors, the disabled children and some of their parents and the disabled.

House members favor keeping Medicaid within DHHS, and phasing in changes that would open up the Medicaid program to management from non-profit groups (called ACOs, or accountable care organizations).

Sen. Ralph Hise, the Republican senator from Spruce Pine who has long pushed for a managed-care solution to Medicaid, said that beginning the Medicaid reform process and moving Medicaid administration into a stand-alone division would allow the legislature to better predict and cap costs for what is the state’s largest program. (Scroll down to watch video of Hise talking about the Senate budget proposal.)

The Senate proposal does have room for ACOs, with options to have managed-care companies offer state-wide coverage while also having six regional divisions that will have slots for ACOs to work, Hise said.

Any changes to the state Medicaid program will need federal approval as well.

The Senate budget, which is expected on the floor for a vote tomorrow, would also cut ties with Community Care of North Carolina, a provider-led network that had been credited with keeping Medicaid costs down by closely managing patient cases, and pairing high-risk patients with primary care physicians. The contract with the state would end by Jan. 1. The cut will amount to a $32 million cut in the 2015-16 budget year, and savings of $65 million in the second year.

There were plenty of other note-worthy details in the budget proposal, with some re-investments in some areas of the budget, and cuts in the others. To read the 504-page budget, click here. The accompanying money report is herehere.

Among the proposed changes were proposals to:

  • Eliminate 520 slots in the state’s pre-kindergarten program, which currently offers early education offerings to 28,700 low-income children.
  • Get rid of the state’s “certificate of need” process by 2019, in which hospitals and medical centers need to make a case to state regulators for adding surgical or other specialized medical offerings, in favor of a more free-market approach that’s been a cause long championed by conservative groups in the state.
  • Extend the foster care age to 21, offering more help for children instead of cutting them off from state services at age 18.
  • Shut down the Wright School, a part-time residential facility in Durham County that provides inpatient help for children with severe disabilities and behavioral issues.
  • Get rid of the Office of Minority Health in DHHS (cut of $3.1 million). Senate Republican leaders said Monday the elimination would allow more money to flow through to actual services that affect minority populations including teen pregnancy and sickle cell programs, but Democrats argued an office dedicated to looking at overall health disparities between racial groups was important.

N.C. Health News has a great rundown as well about what’s in (and what’s not in) the budget. You can read that here.

 

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Rev. William Barber of the N.C. NAACP and Belhaven Mayor Adam O'Neal speak Monday at the U.S. Capitol

Rev. William Barber of the N.C. NAACP and Belhaven Mayor Adam O’Neal speak Monday at the U.S. Capitol

Belhaven Mayor Adam O’Neal completed a walk from his small Eastern North Carolina town to the nation’s capital today, calling on national leaders to help rural communities with sparse healthcare options.

The 283-mile walk – the second year the Republican mayor has done it –– was to bring attention to the pressures faced by the nation’s 283 rural hospitals, especially those in states like North Carolina that opted not to expand Medicaid coverage.

O’Neal reached the steps of the U.S. Capitol Monday, and was joined at a rally with other advocates and allies, including American Federation of Teachers president Randi Weingarten, Belhaven Town Council member Julian Goff and the Rev. William Barber, head of the N.C. NAACP.

Belhaven, located in Beaufort County near the Pamlico Sound, lost its local hospital in 2014, when the hosptial’s owners opted to shut down the small healthcare facility because it couldn’t afford to stay open after North Carolina lawmakers chose to not expand Medicaid coverage in the state.

Residents now have to travel to Greenville for emergency care, a trip that can take over an hour.

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