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The State Ethics Commission will put a searchable database of economic interest forms back online in 2015, though without including the personal contact information of filers.

The Commission voted Friday to approve an amended version of the form – which doesn’t include home address and contact information – which will be made available  in 2015 to the public in an online searchable. A separate form with the filer’s contact information will still be considered a public record and available to the public upon request.

The state Ethics Commission began posting statements of economic interest for hundreds of public officials this summer, but took down the searchable database after fielding complaints from judicial branch officials worried about the easy accessibility of their personal information.

Statements of economic interest are required to be filed annually by state elected officials, some state employees in decision making roles and those who serve on many state boards. The forms require disclosures about sources of income, stocks and properties owned as well as information about individual’s spouses and immediate family members.

Gov. Pat McCrory was criticized earlier this year when he filed an ethics form misstating that he sold his Duke Energy stock in 2013, when the stock had been sold in the spring of 2014, after the coal-ash spill at a Duke-owned plant near the Dan River. McCrory filed an amended ethics form correcting the information, and has said his lawyer misunderstood what what time period the ethics disclosure form was inquiring about.

Also on Friday, the N.C. Ethics Commission ruled that the Academic Standards Review Commission is not considered a  covered board by the State Ethics Act, on the basis that the committee is advisory and academic standards board members are not making final decisions about policy. The academic standards group, which is meeting on Monday, is tasked with reviewing and making recommendations about replacing the state education system’s  Common Core State Standards.

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The Economic Development Partnership of North Carolina released the names of the 17 board members Friday that will oversee the state’s new privatized job recruitment system.

The partnership officially launched in October when the state contracted out much of its job recruitment and tourism division to a private group. A central piece of Republican Gov. Pat McCrory’s jobs platform, the public-private partnership approach to economic development has had mixed results in a handful of other states.

Proponents of the structure say moving the job recruitment duties and $16.5 million in public funding out of state government allows for more flexible and faster responses to leads in recruiting jobs to the state. Critics of the partnership say that the privatized structure encourages a pay-to-play culture, where campaign supporters of political leaders are rewarded or successes amplified to boost the public profiles of governors.

Final decisions about financial incentives will rest with the state Commerce Secretary.

North Carolina’s economic development partnership had been operating under an interim board headed by John Lassiter, a Charlotte businessman and former city councilman close to the governor. Lassiter also used to be the chairman of Renew North Carolina, a political-action committee that can accept anonymous donations from corporate donors and individuals to trumpet McCrory’s successes. Lassiter resigned from the group in early 2014.

But Bob Singer, a Greensboro attorney appointed by McCrory to serve on the new economic development group, remains the head of Renew North Carolina, according to 2013 documents filed with the N.C. Secretary of State’s office.

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Garry Gupton, suspect in attack. Source: Qnotes

Garry Gupton, suspect in attack. Source: Qnotes

UPDATE: Greensboro police say no evidence links to attack being a hate crime. (Scroll down for more information.)

A Greensboro man is in jail facing charges of seriously beating and burning a man he met earlier at a gay nightclub.

Garry Joseph Gupton, a 26-year-old Greensboro water resources employee, is facing a felony charge of assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill and inflicting serious injury, according to jail records and  this article by Matt Comer of Qnotes, a Charlotte-based LGBT news publication. Jail records show Gupton is being held at the jail in lieu of a $250,000 bond.

The 46-year-old victim Stephen Patrick White, who is also a military veteran, was beaten and burnt on over 50 percent of his body from the Nov. 9 attack at a downtown Greensboro hotel. A friend told QNotes that White has had his hand and part of his arm amputated as a result of injuries from the weekend assault.

An employee of the Battleground Inn in Greensboro called 911 around 4:30 a.m. after hearing a man screaming at the hotel at the same time a fire alarm went off, according to QNotes.

Stephen White, victim in Greensboro attack. Source: qnotes

Stephen White, victim in Greensboro attack. Source: qnotes

Police have not described the circumstances preceding the attack, and no charges have been filed indicating the attack may be considered a hate crime. A call to the Greensboro police department seeking additional information was not immediately returned Thursday morning.  (see update below.)

Equality North Carolina, a gay rights group, said in a news release that it is monitoring the investigation.

“We do not yet know the full details of this crime, but anytime a person is harmed, especially in such violent fashion, it is a tragedy regardless of circumstances,” Equality NC director Chris Sgro said in a written statement. “Equality NC is in communication with the Mayor and the City of Greensboro to determine exactly what happened and make sure that the crime is fully investigated.”

A fundraiser will be held this Saturday at the Chemistry Nightclub, 2901 Spring Garden St. in Greensboro, and all proceeds from the door, and tips from the bar and drag shows that night will be donated to help White. Online donations are also being accepted here.

UPDATE (12 p.m., Thursday): Greensboro police told N.C. Policy Watch late Thursday morning that they do not believe that the attack was a hate crime, where the victim was targeted because of his sexual orientation.

“He (Gupton) never verbalized to us that he intended to kill somebody,” said Susan Danielsen, a Greensboro police spokeswoman. “There’s absolutely no evidence to indicate that this is a hate crime.”

Some national outlets in the LGBT community, including the Advocate, have reported that the attack was premeditated, a conclusion that police believe is incorrect.

“We’re not sure what caused Mr. Gupton to act so violently,” Danielsen said. “This is not a crime motivated by hate.”

Danielsen said more charges may be filed in connection with the fire that was set in the hotel room.

Gupton is in custody in the Guilford County jail, and could not be reached for comment.

(Note: this post has changed from the original to reflect that Greensboro police do not believe White was robbed in the course of the attack, contrary to what was reported in QNotes and other publications.)

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Comedian John Oliver took on (and sunk) the idea that state lotteries responsibly and effectively fund public education, when he focused on state lotteries this weekend on his HBO show, “Last Week Tonight.”

North Carolina’s education lottery got a substantial mention (at the 11:30 minute mark) when Oliver pointed out North Carolina spends less per pupil today then it did when the lottery started in 2006.

Take a look here.

 

And if you’d like to walk down memory lane with some of the reporting N.C Policy Watch has done on the state lottery, you can click here to read a 2012 report about how per capita lottery sales spike in some of the state’s poorest counties.

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N.C. Commerce Secretary Sharon Decker says the $22.5 million fund to recruit business to the state is nearly empty, with enough money left to cover one additional jobs project, according to the Triangle Business Journal.

Decker was speaking to a group of commercial real estate developers at the Umstead Hotel in Cary when she made her comments about the state’s Job Development Investments Grants (JDIG) program.

Lawmakers did not fund the incentive program at levels desired by state commerce leaders, and Gov. Pat McCrory has said he is considering calling lawmakers back to Raleigh before their scheduled start in January for the long session.

From the TBJ article:

“And without JDIG, we will not be competitive,” N.C. Commerce Secretary Sharon Decker told members of Research Triangle chapter of NAIOP at its meeting Nov. 7 at the Umstead in Cary.

The JDIG program, since its inception in 2002, has been used by state economic development recruiters to sweeten the pot for companies that are considering a major investment in North Carolina that would lead to the creation of net new jobs in the state.

JDIG has typically been reserved for the largest new jobs deals, and pay-outs are only made after the company reaches a minimum job creation goal. Local companies that have been awarded JDIG grants include MetLife, Ipreo, Sygenta Biotechnology, Allscripts Healthcare and HCL Technologies.

Decker warns that the state is dangerously close to losing its chance to even negotiate on potentially large job-producing deals, including three big economic development prospects that are considering expansion and relocation options in the Triangle that could add another 4,100 jobs in region

You can read the entire article here.