On Monday evening, US House and Senate budget negotiators reached agreement on a detailed $1.012 trillion budget deal that would fund the federal government through the end of September. The House approved the measure yesterday, with the Senate expected to pass the measure later this week. If enacted, the measure would end the looming threat of another government shutdown and roll back the harmful across-the-board spending cuts scheduled to take place over the next year.

The measure fills in the details of a bipartisan agreement struck last month that, as my colleague wrote at the time, represents a “missed opportunity” because it fails to replace the across-the-board spending cuts in the out years and fails to include any new tax revenue. Read More

More than 1 million jobless workers were deserted by lawmakers who failed to extend the federal unemployment benefits program that expired in late December. This came three weeks after the Congressional Budget Office concluded that extending emergency unemployment compensation through the end of 2014 would positively impact economic growth and job creation in the short term. Despite this report, conservative members of the US Senate blocked efforts yesterday to extend unemployment insurance at a time when long-term unemployment is at record high-levels.

To no surprise, conservatives are insisting that the extension of benefits be paid for by cuts in other programs, including those that offer support to low-income and jobless families. In exchange for their vote, some conservative Senators want to bar immigrant families from claiming the Child Tax Credit—a measure known as the Ayotte Amendment. This tactic is misguided and counterproductive. Read More

As we noted in this space on Monday, the North Carolina Fund served as a template for President Johnson’s ambitious—and effective—national “War on Poverty” that was launched 50 years ago.  While such efforts began long ago, the policy prescriptions administered by these efforts remain relevant today. Case in point: the North Carolina Fund established a manpower development program aimed at helping to improve the employability of workers in rural parts of eastern North Carolina. Formed as the state’s economy was undergoing structural changes, this program provided jobless workers with on-the-job training, direct job placement, employment counseling, and much more.

With only one job available for nearly every two jobless workers in the state today, policymakers should give serious consideration to a modern version of this program that will fit today’s needs as Tar Heels continue to struggle with elevated rates of unemployment and long-term unemployment. Highlighting the North Carolina Fund’s Manpower Program, below is a second excerpt from “Everybody’s Problem”: Whites, Blacks, and the Fight Against Poverty in Eastern North Carolina, 1963-1969,” written by Karen M. Hawkins and currently under review with the University of Florida Press. Read More

Last week marked the 50th anniversary of President Johnson’s State of the Union Address where he declared an “unconditional war on poverty in America.” As we all work to highlight the progress that has been made against poverty over the last half-century, it is important to acknowledge how the North Carolina Fund served as a template for President Johnson’s ambitious—and effective—national “War on Poverty” as well as the initiative’s own successes.

In that effort, below is an excerpt from “Everybody’s Problem”: Whites, Blacks, and the Fight Against Poverty in Eastern North Carolina, 1963-1969,” written by Karen M. Hawkins and currently under review with the University of Florida Press. On Wednesday, we’ll post a second excerpt from Ms. Hawkins’ book that will highlight the successful Manpower Program that was administered by the North Carolina Fund. This program targeted jobless workers in rural areas, and provided them with on-the-job training, direct job placement, employment counseling, and vocational guidance. Read More

Fifty years ago this week, President Johnson launched a crusade against poverty. As we reflect on those efforts, we must recognize the War on Poverty’s successes as well as the work that remains. The good news is that safety net initiatives inspired by the War on Poverty reduce the number of families living in poverty by almost half, while simultaneously reducing the depth of the hardship faced by poor families. The bad news, however, is that despite this progress, economic hardship still remains high across too many communities in North Carolina.

North Carolina is enduring a painfully slow economy and workers are facing too few jobs and wage stagnation. The ongoing hardship is evidenced in new data released last month by the Census Bureau’s Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (SAIPE) program. This new data allows us to analyze poverty and income trends in all 100 counties over the same one-year period—a level of specificity not possible in the data released by the Census Bureau last fall. Read More