immigration, NC Budget and Tax Center

Refugees help North Carolina communities thrive

North Carolina has a history of being a good global neighbor as a site for refugee resettlement. In 2015, 69,920 refugees arrived in our country seeking better opportunities. Though small in number (0.022% of the total U.S. population), they and their predecessors have helped enrich communities and revive local economies. They arrive to this country fleeing natural disasters, war zones, and repressive governments. Despite the challenges they face in adjusting to life in a new country, many have succeeded in putting down roots in our state and in achieving a better life for their families. A recent report by the Center for American Progress highlights the successful integration of four refugee groups* in the United States, and demonstrates the positive impact refugees can have on our broader communities. Across the board, refugees who have lived in the United States for 10 years or more have seen positive outcomes in the areas of education, wages, labor force participation, and more.

Growing local economies by participating in the labor market

Refugees often see high rates of labor force participation, which is a strong indicator that they are integrating well into the labor market and helping boost American productivity. For those groups who have lived in the U.S. for 10 years or fewer, all had at least a 45 percent participation rate. When looking at long-term outcomes (those who have lived in the U.S. 10 years or more), all refugee groups saw significant increases in labor force participation.

Additionally, refugees often see wage increases over time, which is partly due to changes in occupation as they integrate into communities. Many also experience occupational mobility. On average, among those who have lived in the U.S. for 10 years or more, there is a significant increase in the number of refugees moving from blue collar jobs into white collar jobs.    Read more

Courts & the Law, immigration, News, Trump Administration

Scenes from the march for immigrants and refugees at Raleigh-Durham International Airport

Drums and chants, horns and tambourines: More than 1,000 people rallied at RDU Sunday to show their solidarity with refugees and immigrants targeted by President Trump’s executive order. That order, whose constitutionality is being challenged nationwide, temporarily bans immigrants and refugees from six Muslim-dominant countries; for a seventh country, Syria, the ban is indefinite.

Here are scenes from the rally.

Click on a photo for a larger view.