NC Budget and Tax Center

NC Budget and Tax Center

Economic hardship persisted at high levels in the nation and North Carolina in 2013, according to new figures released today from the Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey (CPS). The 2013 national poverty rate was 14.5 percent, down from 15 percent in 2012 but still well-above pre-recession levels four years into the official economic recovery. There were 45.3 million Americans living below the official federal poverty line, which was $11,490 for an individual and $23,550 for a family of four in 2013.

There is broad consensus that poverty rates will not drop to pre-recession levels anytime soon. And, two economic factors suggested that poverty rates would remain elevated in 2013, as the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities explains. First, the economy is growing but those gains continue to bypass middle- and lower-income families and are mostly benefitting the wealthy. Second, lawmakers enacted austerity measures in 2013 that reduced public contributions to the economy and failed to put children, families, and communities on a better path forward. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

Each year public schools across the state experience changes in their student enrollment levels – some see an increase, others a decline, while enrollment in some schools remain steady. A policy change included in the budget approved by state lawmakers for the current fiscal year 2015 means schools experiencing growth in student enrollment are no longer guaranteed to receive full state funding for the additional students when state lawmakers create a budget for the next school year.

The new provision in the budget no longer includes enrollment adjustments for public schools as part of the baseline budget, also referred to as the continuation budget. Prior to this policy change the state’s budgeting process took enrollment adjustments into account when determining how much state funding is required to maintain education service levels. Doing so more accurately reflect the actual level of state funding that should be invested in K-12 education.

Public schools that experience an increase in student enrollment from one year to the next must now wait until state lawmakers finalize a budget for the next fiscal year to know if enrollment growth is fully funded. Many public schools across the state could potentially feel the impact of this deceptively subtle policy change. Read More

Falling Behind in NC, NC Budget and Tax Center

Lawmakers let the state Earned Income Tax Credit expire at the end of 2013, making North Carolina the first state in nearly 30 years to eliminate this proven anti-poverty tool. The state EITC helps promote shared economic prosperity for all North Carolinians. It goes only to working people with modest incomes, offering extra support to pay for basic necessities.

In a new video from the series “North Carolina: First in Flight from the EITC,” Heather Partridge talks about how the state EITC has helped her family. Heather lives with her husband and three daughters in Gibsonville, where she works at Hardee’s and earns $7.55 an hour – just barely above the state minimum wage of $7.25. In past years, the EITC has helped Heather pay for everyday goods for her children as well as pay off debt.  Read More

Falling Behind in NC, NC Budget and Tax Center

As North Carolina continues to recover from the Great Recession, most of the jobs that have been added pay low wages, making affording even basic necessities difficult for many hard-working North Carolinians. Raising the state minimum wage and reinstating a state Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) are two policy tools that North Carolina state lawmakers can use to help boost wages, widen the path out of poverty, and reduce income inequality, a report released this week by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) highlights.

Wages for the least paid workers are no higher than they were 40 years ago, the CBPP report highlights. Yet evidence shows that lifting the income of families earning low wages provides a range of benefits, including improved learning and educational attainment and higher future earnings in adulthood for low-income young children. Furthermore, raising the minimum wage and an enhanced state EITC together works to put families and individuals on a path to financial stability and self-sufficiency. Read More

The State of Working North Carolina

Each year on Labor Day our State of Working North Carolina report details the economic conditions and trends that face North Carolina’s workers.  This year, in addition to focusing on these conditions and trends today, we also delved deeper how the current lack of jobs and the growth of low-wage jobs will impact the state’s economic future, particularly given demographic trends in the state.

This week’s Prosperity Watch takes a look in particular at the resiliency in the African-American labor force in the context of a shrinking of the state’s labor force and a significant number of North Carolinians who remain missing from the labor force.  Both trends are primarily driven by the lack of jobs and together are holding back the state’s full recovery.  Within these broader trends, however, and despite higher unemployment rates, African-American workers have remained in the labor force at a greater rate than other workers.  From Prosperity Watch:

In the face of high unemployment and labor market outcomes that are pushing African-Americans in particular further behind, an interesting trend has emerged.  In the nation as whole and North Carolina, African-American workers have demonstrated resiliency in their connection to the labor force. The unemployment rate for African-Americans remains much higher relative to whites, growing by 4.6 percentage points from 2007 to 2013 compared to a 2.7 percentage point change over the same period for whites. And yet, African-Americans have been much less likely to leave the labor force altogether despite weak job prospects.  The labor force participation rate changed from 2007 to 2013 for African-Americans by 2.6 percentage points while dropping far more for whites by 4.2 percentage points.

The labor force resiliency of African-American workers is contributing to the persistent difference in unemployment rates between African-Americans and whites.  But on the positive side, when jobs return, it could also position African-American workers for faster re-employment.