NC Budget and Tax Center

NC Budget and Tax Center

A new paper by UC Berkeley economist Danny Yagan provides further evidence that tax breaks that largely benefit the wealthy and profitable corporations are not a remedy for boosting the economy. In 2003, President George W. Bush passed one of the largest cuts ever to a federal capital tax rate – reducing the top tax rate on dividends to 15 percent from 38.6 percent. Using federal IRS data on corporate tax returns, Yagan compared corporations that benefited from this tax cut (C-corporations) to firms that didn’t benefit from the tax cut (S-corporations).

Corporations that got a massive dividend tax cut didn’t make any different choices about things that boost the real economy, the new paper highlights. The massive reduction to the federal dividend tax rate resulted in no meaningful change in corporate investment, net investment, or employee compensation for corporations. What did change following the huge dividend tax cut was an increase in payout to corporate shareholders. Simply put, the tax cut benefited corporate shareholders but not the overall economy.

Some lawmakers and outside groups in North Carolina are pushing to eliminate capital gains from state taxes. Governor McCrory recently announced his desire to eliminate the state’s capital gains tax for what he deems “innovation-related companies”. Either proposal to cut capital gains taxes would overwhelmingly benefit the wealthy at the expense of everyone else in the state, a recently released BTC report highlights. Proponents often claim that eliminating or reducing the capital gains tax rate will increase investment and help boost the economy. However, no apparent cause-and-effect relationship exists between changes in the top capital gains tax rate and savings, investment, or productivity growth. Instead, various analyses highlight how cutting capital gains tax rates have concentrated income at the very top. There is simply no reason to expect this reality to somehow be any different in North Carolina.

Bigger tax breaks for the rich while the state is cutting support for schools and other essential job-creation tools is not a path that promotes economic opportunity and prosperity for all North Carolinians. This new paper serves as yet more evidence that state lawmakers should reject calls to eliminate or cut capital gains taxes and instead work to make sure the wealthiest North Carolinians and profitable corporations pay their fair share.

NC Budget and Tax Center

A new report from the Migration Policy Institute, Lessons from the Local Level: DACA’s Implementation and Impact on Education and Training Success, finds that both educational attainment for immigrants who arrived as children and achievement of broader economic benefits resulting from their increased earnings, participation in the labor force and payment of taxes are dependent on state policy in the K-12, post-secondary and adult education arena.

State policies that support DACA youth with the financial resources, student supports and relevant training programs for career success have been effective at increasing DACA youth enrollment in post-secondary education and increased students returning to high school or GED programs.

From the report here are a few relevant findings for North Carolina: Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

The Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN) released a report today published by the Economic Policy Institute on the latest data on income inequality in the states. The data is unique in providing assessments of how the top 1 percent are faring compared to the bottom 99 percent. The findings are consistent though with what we know about the pulling apart of our nation’s income earners: the very top are capturing the largest share of income growth while everyone else is seeing their incomes stagnate or fall.

The problem with this outcome, which is driven by policy choices at both the national and state levels, is that when everyone doesn’t enjoy the benefits of a growing economy and increasing incomes despite having contributed by being more productive, the economy can’t reach its full potential.

Equitable growth is increasingly seen as superior to growth that concentrates the winnings in the hands of those at the top. That is because more equitable growth can be sustained for longer periods because it sustains consumer spending and doesn’t require reliance on debt to finance basic needs. And while improved data to quantify the relationship between inequality and growth is needed, the emerging evidence demonstrates that in the long-run a stronger economy is built on a foundation of broadly shared income growth. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

State revenue collections are coming in $199.2 million below projections half way through the fiscal year, according to the legislature’s non-partisan Fiscal Research Division’s new revenue outlook report. This report provides an assessment of revenue collection performance for the state on a quarterly basis. The main culprit behind the mid-year shortfall is the 2013 tax plan that reduces revenue availability while primarily benefitting wealthy taxpayers and profitable corporations. The plan’s personal income tax cuts are costing more than previously expected.

The growing cost of the 2013 tax plan further challenges state lawmakers’ ability to rebuild what was lost in the aftermath of the Great Recession and reposition itself to compete nationally and globally. North Carolinians are already dealing with the fallout of the current state budget that falls short of what’s needed for children, families, and communities to thrive. The inadequacy of the budget has been chronicled in the news, with many stories focusing on how there are too few textbooks (even toilet paper) as well as the local challenges that state budget and tax decisions are creating.

It is important to view this mid-year revenue shortfall in the context of the dollars that lawmakers already lost due to the tax plan. For the 2015 fiscal year, Fiscal Research Division originally estimated that the plan would cost $512.8 million but soon revised its revenue outlook to account for an additional loss of $191 million. This latest report of $199.2 million in under-collections comes on top of these already-accounted-for losses.  By the end of the fiscal year, the total cost of the tax plan could reach as high as $1.1 billion, according to the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy’s estimates. That’s roughly equivalent to the state dollars that support the entire Community College System.

Highlights of the Revenue Outlook Report Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

A new report released today by the Budget & Tax Center highlights how eliminating North Carolina’s taxes on capital gains would largely benefit those who need it least while making things worse for families struggling to make ends meet.

Some lawmakers and outside groups in North Carolina are pushing a plan that would benefit the wealthy at the expense of everyone else by ending state taxation of profits from selling artwork, vacation homes and other high-end items owned by relatively few North Carolinians. The proposal is part of a larger push to radically alter North Carolina’s tax structure to the detriment of the long-term well-being of the state and its residents.

Cap gains allocation

Key findings from the report include:

  • Eliminating capital gains from state income tax would reduce annual state revenue by $520 million, meaning even less revenue for public investments that help drive the state’s economy forward. This revenue loss would be in addition to the costly 2013 tax plan, which is projected to reduce state revenue by as much as $1.1 billion for the fiscal year that ends June 30.

Read More