NC Budget and Tax Center

NC Budget and Tax Center

Contributed by MDC

What’s one thing that all places in North Carolina have in common? From our booming metros to our small towns, from Roanoke Rapids to Cullowhee, income mobility for low-income young people in this state, and in the South in general, is far worse than in other U.S. regions. It’s surprising to learn that even in our most economically dynamic places like Charlotte and the Triangle, people who grow up in families at the low end of the income distribution are likely to stay there as adults, and only small numbers make it to the middle or top. According to data from the Equality of Opportunity Project, for young people born in the bottom quintile of the income distribution in the Triangle, 37 percent will stay there as adults, another 29 percent will only move up one quintile, and a mere 5 percent will make it to the highest quintile.

Over the past two decades, Durham has moved from a low-skilled, tobacco-reliant community to become the “City of Medicine” and a Southern center of culture and creativity. Its dynamic, knowledge-based economy is a magnet for the health, pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and IT industries. Its universities and Research Triangle Park, both created and sustained through a history of public and private investment, are rich in employers and in the middle-skill jobs that pay living wages for new recruits, boasting an employment rate projected to outstrip the state and the U.S. by 2021. Yet, despite this thriving market, too few youth and young adults who grow up in Durham, particularly youth of color, are getting these good jobs, and too few have the academic and workplace skills to compete with more qualified candidates from other cities and states. Many struggle to find their way through a fragmented collection of institutions and organizations that are working to support young people but are not always well-resourced or working together. Much of this reflects Durham’s history as a tobacco and textile manufacturing center, where employment was not conditioned on education or credentialing, along with a legacy of race-based inequity in educational investment and expectations.

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NC Budget and Tax Center

A report released yesterday by ThinkNC First argues that decision makers in Raleigh have walked away from many of the programs that helped to build a middle-class in North Carolina. Authors William Lester and Nichola Lowe of the University of North Carolina review data showing that middle-income jobs have become much harder to find over the last decade. The report ties this disturbing trend to recent policy decisions to underfund state programs that foster industries that create livable wages and ensure that all North Carolinians can access those jobs. The report makes a strong case that state leaders should heed our history and remember how North Carolina became an economic powerhouse in the Southeast in the first place.

The central problem documented in the report is becoming increasingly difficult to ignore. For the second half of the 20th century, North Carolina’s economy generated strong employment growth up a down the wage scale. Since the start of the Great Recession however, most of the job growth has been in either very high or very low paying industries. The labor market hollowed out, as many industries, particularly in manufacturing, saw employment decline. We here are the Budget and Tax Center have been watching this same trend, and its not pretty.

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NC Budget and Tax Center

It is becoming ever clearer that recent tax cuts have not endeared North Carolina to the entire business community. Proponents of the 2013 tax cuts argued that they would create a more competitive and business-friendly climate. Looking at recent business climate rankings, however, undermines this argument in two key ways.

First, multinational corporations already liked North Carolina just fine before the latest tax cuts. Second, the tax cuts have undermined our economic competitiveness in other important areas.

The 2014 Top Competitive States ranking by Site Selection, in which North Carolina is ranked #1, suggests that the tax cuts worked. However, North Carolina has consistently been at or near the top of the Site Selection rankings for a decade, including being #1 in some years prior to the 2013 round of tax changes. This ranking is largely based on the level of private capital investment a state secures, the number of jobs created, and a state’s tax climate – as determined by the conservative Tax Foundation. Essentially, low tax rates and high levels of capital investments – made possible in part due to generous economic incentives provided to corporations by state governments – benefits a state’s performance in this ranking. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center, Uncategorized

As state lawmakers negotiate behind closed doors on a final budget deal, North Carolinians came together on Twitter to have their say on the smart investments that will best move the state forward. North Carolinians know that if we want to build a more inclusive and prosperous state for everyone, the state budget is key to getting there. Securing that goal, however, requires state lawmakers to pursue fiscal policies that enable North Carolina to reinvest and rebuild in the foundations of a strong economy.

Better choices are available than the ones that the Senate and House leadership are pursuing. That’s why every day North Carolinians and representatives from advocacy groups participated in a Twitter Chat, using the #MyNCBudget hashtag. Participants quickly pointed out that further tax cuts—as proposed in both the House and Senate budgets—would hamper the state’s ability to realize their vision for investments that benefit children, families, and communities across the state. They urged lawmakers to reinvest in early childhood education, K-12 and higher education, healthy communities, justice programs, living-wage policies, and a lot more.

There were so many strong voices that the conversation was trending in the Raleigh market. You can check out the conversation on Twitter at #MyNCBudget. Below is a preview of the discussion. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

Within the last month, policymakers in three states approved tax changes that will strengthen family economic security and support a stronger, more inclusive economy. Policymakers in New Jersey and Rhode Island approved expansions in their state Earned Income Tax Credits (EITC) and California officials adopted its first state EITC, which goes to people that work but earn low wages so that they can better make ends meet and avoid raising their children in poverty.

North Carolina is no longer among the 26 states that have a state EITC. Our state lawmakers allowed the state EITC to expire in 2013 when they enacted deep tax cuts that primarily benefited the wealthy and profitable corporations. The result was a tax shift—away from the wealthy and onto everyone else—that did nothing to improve the financial well-being of people who work hard for low pay and struggle to pay the bills.

On the other end of the spectrum, New Jersey lawmakers approved an increase in its state EITC to 30 percent from 20 percent of the federal credit that will benefit over half a million families. Read More