NC Budget and Tax Center

NC Budget and Tax Center

North Carolinians are being dealt a bad hand. The deep revenue losses resulting from the 2013 tax plan is creating a reality in which there are too few dollars available to meet the needs of children, families, and communities. Budget writers are facing a self-imposed budget crisis and finding it difficult to agree on just how large the cut to public schools and public health should be to meet its priorities and balance the budget. To be clear, budget writers agree that those core budget areas should be cut compared to the enacted 2015 fiscal year budget but have yet to agree on the size of the cut.

That’s the main reason why North Carolina is more than two weeks into the new fiscal year without a revised state budget.

For weeks budget negotiators in the House and Senate have been shuffling the deck, making proposed cuts in core areas of the budget and moving that money around in order to finance much-needed pay raises. This budget shuffle is further proof the state is facing a revenue problem. Read More

NC Budget and Tax Center

In case you’ve missed it, there has been a phenomenal film series going on this summer throughout North Carolina, which concludes this month with screenings of “Inequality for All” in nine cities from July 22nd – July 31st. The Moral Movies film series, which also included showings of American Teacher, American Winter and Freedom Summer, is sponsored by Working Films, NC NAACP, NCAE, Tar Heel Alliance of Classroom Teachers, Democracy NC, NC State AFL-CIO, NC Justice Center and a number of local partners.

The films offer a way for North Carolinians to see informative documentaries on multiple issues such as education, poverty, workers’ rights, voting rights, civil rights and inequality, and discuss their implications in the context of our state’s current policy environment and the continuing march towards social and economic justice. Following each film, attendees are provided opportunities to take action to improve the lives of all North Carolinians through improving investments in education, raising wages for workers, ensuring broader access to voting rights, or decreasing a widening income and wealth gap. Hundreds have attended one or more of the films in the series around the state, which kicked off in April with American Teacher.

The last film in the series, Inequality for All, features Robert Reich – professor, best-selling author, and Clinton cabinet member – as he demonstrates how the widening income gap is having a devastating impact on the American economy. Reich suggests that the massive consolidation of wealth by a precious few threatens the viability of the American workforce and the foundation of democracy itself. The film unfortunately resonates clearly with North Carolina’s experience given that recent legislative developments such as continued underinvestment in education and economic development, a lopsided tax plan giving big breaks to wealthy taxpayers and corporations while increasing taxes on the majority of working families, limitations to living wage policy and inaction to move towards a living wage has contributed to growing inequality.

Don’t miss your last chance to participate in Moral Movies and register to attend a screening near you this month:

Schedule of Screenings:

Winston Salem: Tuesday July 22, 6 p.m. (RSVP)

Green Street United Methodist Church, 639 S Green St, Winston-Salem, NC 27101

Fayetteville: Tuesday July 22, 6 p.m. (RSVP)

The Main Library, 300 Maiden Lane, Fayetteville, NC, 28301

Asheville: Friday July 25, 7 p.m. (RSVP)

Ferguson Auditorium at AB Tech, 340 Victoria Rd. Asheville NC 28801

Greenville: Tuesday July 29, 7 p.m. (RSVP)

Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 131 Oakmont Dr. Greenville, NC 27858

Raleigh: Tuesday, July 29, 7 p.m. (RSVP)

Community UCC, 814 Dixie Trail, Raleigh, NC 27607

Durham: Thursday July 31, 6:30 p.m. (RSVP)

Durham County Public Library Auditorium, 300 N Roxboro St. Durham, NC 27701

Greensboro: Thursday, July 31, 7 p.m. (RSVP)

Central Library Nussbaum Room, 219 N Church St. Greensboro, NC 27405

Wilmington: Thursday, July 31, 7 p.m. (RSVP)

Cameron Art Museum, 3201 S. 17th St. Wilmington, NC 28412

Charlotte: Thursday, July 31, 7 p.m. (RSVP)

Unitarian Universalist Church of Charlotte 234 N Sharon Amity Rd, Charlotte, NC, 28211

 

NC Budget and Tax Center

Jobs11-5During the debate over last year’s billion-dollar-a-year tax cut plan, supporters made a lot of big promises about the supposed economic benefits of cutting corporate and personal income taxes for wealthy individuals and highly profitable corporations. The problem—as many warned at the time—is that tax cuts almost never live up to their promises.

And that’s the point made in a recent piece by the well-respected Fiscal Times. In order for the tax proponents’ claims to be true, North Carolina would have needed to generate job growth that is significantly better than other states and the national average. According to the Fiscal Times:

The trouble is that the promised job growth hasn’t really materialized.

To be sure, with the U.S. economy as a whole adding jobs at a pace of 250,000 per month, there aren’t many states seeing a downturn in employment anymore. But the promises that went along with the tax cuts and reduced spending weren’t about keeping up with the rest of the country, but about surging ahead.

The Fiscal Times examined the job creation record of North Carolina and two other states that have experimented with deep tax cuts—Kansas and Wisconsin—and found that:

The dramatic tax cutting doesn’t appear to have done nearly as much for job growth as promised.

Wisconsin and Kansas, for example, have actually lagged the national average in job creation since their big tax cuts and budget cuts were enacted:

Read More

Falling Behind in NC

If you work hard and play by the rules, you deserve a chance to get ahead. This is why the Earned Income Tax Credit was invented: to help families with low-paying jobs make ends meet.

Unfortunately, North Carolina is the first state in 30 years to eliminate its Earned Income Tax Credit. This move abandoned a bunch of our neighbors, people with stories like Kara’s:

YouTube Preview Image

There is no more stark illustration of why tax policy matters. With NC job growth coming primarily in low-wage industries, we’re going to need the Earned Income Tax Credit — and other measures that work for working people — more than ever.

 

NC Budget and Tax Center

Among the nation’s 50 states, North Carolina experienced the biggest increase in the proportion of people living in high-poverty areas between 2000 and 2010, according to a new U.S. Census Bureau  report.The growing number of North Carolinians living in disadvantaged neighborhoods is problematic because they face restricted access to the jobs, education, and networks that can improve their financial standing.The new report signals the need for policymakers to focus on the investments and policies that support ladders of opportunity, from Murphy to Manteo, to all North Carolinians.

The report defined high-poverty areas as places that have poverty rates of 20 percent or higher. The federal poverty level for a family of 4 is stingy, a mere $23,550—which is far lower than the $52,275 needed to make ends meet in North Carolina, per the Budget and Tax Center’s 2014 Living Income Standard. And, the 2010 data reflects the 2008-2012 five-year average.

The extent of people (poor and non-poor) living in high-poverty areas is far worse in North Carolina than in the nation, according to the report. In 2010, 31.8 percent of all North Carolinians lived in high-poverty areas compared to 25.7 percent of all Americans. If you’re poor, however, the chances of also living in high-poverty areas are far higher: more than 1 in 2 poor North Carolinians live in high-poverty areas—a concept known as the “double burden.”

In the entire nation, the share of people (poor and non-poor) living in high-poverty areas grew the fastest in North Carolina from 2000 to 2010, jumping 17.9 percentage points (see graphic below). Read More